Arts & Culture

3:11pm

Wed February 29, 2012
Arts & Culture

Beatles Karaoke

Joshua Raoul Brody, of the band Tango Number 9, plays live piano to match each singer’s style.
photo credit: Terry Lorant

The vocalist you’re hearing is Dana Harnik, participating in the monthly all-Beatles karaoke night at Café Royale on Post Street in San Francisco. Note that this is no “follow the bouncing ball” laser-disc performance. Joshua Raoul Brody, of the band Tango Number 9, plays live piano to match each singer’s style. The next event takes place Monday, March 5, and the first Monday of every month. Music begins about 8pm, and a book of lyrics is provided.

 

1:23pm

Wed February 29, 2012
Arts & Culture

San Franciscans rally to save historic bar

Friends of the Gold Dust Lounge have filed a petition to give the bar landmark status

All great cities have them: famous watering holes popular with tourists and locals alike. They serve as sources of liquid inspiration for artists, writers and musicians – and as meeting places for politicians and businesspeople looking to put the finishing touches on a big deal over an afternoon libation.

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5:13pm

Tue February 28, 2012
Arts & Culture

Brandon McFarland knows what's up with Bay Area music

Brandon McFarland is the editor of Youth Radio's streaming radio station, AllDayPlay.fm

Brandon McFarland is the editor of Youth Radio's radio station, AllDayPlay.fm. He joined KALW’s Ben Trefny to talk about the latest in Bay Area music.

BEN TREFNY: So tell me about what’s new on All Day Play.

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2:45pm

Tue February 28, 2012
Arts & Culture

Revisiting Richmond's boxcar village

Emily DeCory’s family was one of many Laguna tribe families that moved to Richmond, California, to work on the railroad.

Some of the first people in the Bay Area were Native Americans – members of the Ohlone tribe, who settled around what is now the city of Richmond. Beginning in the 1920s, another group of Native people found their way to the Bay Area. They were migrants from the Acoma and Laguna tribes of the Southwest. When they arrived, they took up an unusual living arrangement: in boxcars, parked on the dead ends of the city’s railroad tracks.

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2:41pm

Tue February 28, 2012
Arts & Culture

A history built on hearsay: Tales of the early Chinese settlers

Artistic director Rene Yung (right) gives instructions to the proxy storytellers during a rehearsal of the theater and oral history project “Chinese Whispers." Photo courtesy of Chinese Whispers

In the mid-1800s, the Gold Rush brought enthusiastic settlers westward, from across the United States. At the same time, another migration was flowing eastward.

Over three decades, the country’s Chinese population grew from 4,000 to over 100,000. The immigrants who landed on California’s shores followed the Transcontinental Railroad across the state, building pockets of community along the way.

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