Audio Academy

Enrollment now open for the KALW Audio Academy

KALW is calling for applicants for our 9-month radio journalism training program based at KALW public radio, an NPR and BBC affiliate station in San Francisco. This program is designed to give you a professional audio production education, tuition-free.

We’re looking for creative thinkers who are great writers and storytellers with a passion for covering diverse communities and some knowledge of the Bay Area.

Living with HIV as a senior

Feb 10, 2015
Jasmin Lopez

People 50 years or older now make up the majority of HIV and AIDS cases in San Francisco. Since HIV emerged in the 1980s, treatments have improved -- allowing people to live longer with this chronic illness. So as the number of older people living with HIV grows, so do the other things that come with age -- like access to affordable housing and health care, mental health issues and isolation.

Jeremy Dalmas

 

In a quiet spot, just west of the bustle of the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, sits a garden dedicated to English literature’s crowned prince: William Shakespeare. Once you make it past the entrance gate and down the worn brick path, you are transported into an English garden filled with manicured flower beds, trimmed lawns, and people escaping the noise of the city.

A Nepali soup kitchen for the soul

Sep 22, 2014
Rachel Wong

Audio Pending...

Around 5pm on a cold, windy Tuesday, an eclectic mix of people stand in a long line at Civic Center’s UN Plaza in San Francisco, waiting patiently. Some have big travel backpacks, a couple have tough-looking dogs, and a few are dressed like they just came from work. Suddenly a bright orange and yellow minivan arrives at the plaza. A team of volunteers wearing orange aprons emerge and quickly set up tents, tables, and giant, metal vats of steaming food. The food smells of ginger and garlic.

Making a home for bees by the freeway

Aug 28, 2014
Charlotte Silver

In a city that struggles to find enough space for housing, parking or children, a few dedicated people have found a luxurious, spacious and cheap home for bees.

David Boyer

On Sunday mornings in the Castro neighborhood, there’s a place where rhythm reigns. Dancers pull out their leg warmers, spandex and fluorescent headbands for Sunday Skool—and with the right accessories and a lot of attitude, dreams of being a backup dancer for a day come true. 

Enrollment now open for the 2014-2015 KALW News Audio Academy

Mar 25, 2014

Enrollment now open for the KALW News Audio Academy 

KALW is calling for applicants for our 10-month radio journalism training program based at KALW public radio, an NPR and BBC affiliate station in San Francisco. This program is designed to give you a graduate level audio production education, tuition-free.

We’re looking for creative thinkers who are great writers and storytellers with a passion for covering diverse communities, and ideally have some knowledge of the Bay Area.

Todd Whitney

 

City Hall isn’t the only place you will find Oakland’s namesake, the oak tree. Step foot in the East Bay and you will quickly come across t-shirts, hoodies, hats, and stickers that brandish an image of the iconic tree. This wave of Oakland-themed apparel reaches back to the year 2000 when Oaklandish, a civic pride apparel brand, popped up.

Flickr user: Waponi

When you fill out a job application, you expect to answer some basic questions. Things like your employment and education history, and relevant skills to the job. And in many cases, you also have to check a box to declare whether you’ve ever been convicted of a crime.

In the city of Richmond, though, that last one is no longer fair game. It hasn’t been for a couple of years, since the city passed an ordinance called “ban the box,” forbidding government employees from asking job applicants about their criminal histories.

More than 50 cities and counties, as well as 10 states, have enacted some form of “ban the box” laws. That includes California.

Reporter’s Notebook: My uncle’s battle with HIV

Feb 4, 2014

When I was eight years old, I rode on one of Mexico’s passenger trains from Mexicali to Guadalajara with my uncle, David. All summer, we visited towns and family throughout the country, learning more and more about our heritage and each other. At the time, I had only heard of him through the occasional family story, so I was unaware of my uncle’s estrangement from our family. I’m not sure what the circumstances were that allowed us to travel together, but I’m grateful for them. I was able to spend a summer on an unforgettable adventure with an uncle that I wouldn’t see again.

Liz Mak / KALW

 

Jeremy Mykaels is in his early 60s, and he has AIDS. As a young gay man, he moved to the Castro, where he has lived for almost 40 years. He's been in his Victorian apartment on Noe Street for about half of that time -- but he may not be living here much longer.

Marin County's One Room Schoolhouse

Jan 29, 2014
Rhian Miller


David Boyer

 

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

This auditory guessing game is part of Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the sonic signature of each of the Bay Area’s nine counties. By using the sounds of voices, nature, industry, and music, Audiograph tells the story of where you live, and the people who live there with you. Every Thursday, we reveal the origins of that week's sound on Crosscurrents, and here in weekly blog posts.

Rachel Wong

One of the first things you hear when you enter the East Bay Vivarium is lots of scratching. It's coming from inside a large cage at a giant lizard that’s nearly as long as I am tall. “His name is Elmo, he’s a good guy. People love him,” says Owen Maerks, one of the co-owners here at the Vivarium.

 

Near dusk, you can often find Shirley Doell at Oakland Civic Center, staring at the tops of skyscrapers through her big telescope. But she isn’t spying on anyone – at least not any people. She’s on the lookout for Peregrine Falcons. They were on the brink of extinction a few decades ago, when there were only two breeding pairs left in California. But there are about 300 nests in the state now and they’ve started moving into cities.

Leila Day

If you walk down Mission Street this weekend you’ll see family members holding pictures of loved ones in one hand and candles in another. You may see ofrendas--small altars set up to pay tribute to people who have passed away. It’s a tradition that’s been present in the Mission for years, but how it’s celebrated depends on who you ask.

Ray Ambler

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Under CC license from Flickr user MaestroBen

 

Dionne Wilson's husband, a San Leandro police officer, was killed in the line of duty seven years ago, but she says it took her a long time to find a way to really heal.

“For many years, I carried around so much vengeance and hate. I realized at a certain point I had nothing left. I had no more tools. I engaged in a lot of self-destructive behavior. I tried to buy my way out of my grief; I tried to drink my way out for a short period. Thankfully, I didn’t take that too far. And I just didn’t have a way to move past being embroiled in the moment,” says Wilson.

Wilson initially thought the trial and conviction of her husband’s murderer would bring her some sort of comfort or closure.

Neighborhood Postcard: Sunset

Sep 25, 2013
Sara Brooke Curtis

 Ocean Beach is right on the edge of San Francisco’s biggest neighborhood, the Sunset. The neighborhood is so large it’s split into two: an inner and outer.

“Across the street from me now is Art's Hamburgers or whatever they call themselves now. Which in 1967, the waitress had put a little sign in the window and it said 'love burgers 25 cents each.' The area really looks like 1965,” says Casey Farrell, a Sunset resident.

Youth Radio

There is a new kind of swap meet happening around the Bay Area lately, where gun owners are trading their firearms for cash. Over the past week, San Francisco and Oakland have each been host to a buyback event, bringing in nearly 260 guns total. In exchange, gun owners were paid $100 for each gun, and $200 for each assault weapon, with no questions asked. A large part of funding for the swaps came from crowd sourced donations, including the first-known crowd sourced gun back, held last Thursday in San Francisco's Mission District. Jasmin Lopez went to 22nd and Capp Street that evening to talk to people who were selling their guns.