ballot initiatives

Liza Veale

 

If you’ve heard of Proposition 13, you probably know that it cut property taxes back in 1978, which reduced funding for public schools and other services. It also has a lot to do with the state’s shortage of housing and, many argue, the fact that rents are so darn high.

"Marijuana" by CC Flickr user Memento Mori, resized and recropped

 

Pot smokers throughout California are looking toward January 1, when marijuana will be legally available to adults. It was made possible last election when Prop. 64 passed.

 

But there are some major snags.

Innovations in supporting survivors of violent crime

Aug 28, 2017

August 28, 2017: Survivors of violent crime often suffer from the lingering effects of trauma for the rest of their lives. 

Estate Planning -- Leaving Your Home to Your Child/Children: Will the Proposition 13 Tax Basis Be Passed on from Parent to Child? Guest: John C. Martin, a Specialist in Estate Planning, Trust & Probate Law, Certified by the California Board of Legal Specialization. Questions for Chuck &  John? Please call toll-free 1-866-798-8255.

Prop 13: Mad as Hell

Nov 14, 2016
Photo courtesy of Retro Report

In 1978, when Howard Jarvis declared that he was mad as hell about rising property taxes in California, he started a tax revolt in the state. Thirty-eight years later, Jarvis’s Proposition 13 is still on the books in California, but the debate over its consequences remains.

What Will California Voters Decide?

Nov 2, 2016

November 7, 2016: While the Presidential race has dominated the headlines, Bay Area ballots brim with 17 State propositions, in addition to the U.S. Senate, House and California State races. Host Joseph Pace and guests provide special coverage of the 2016 Election and explore the biggest decisions facing California voters on Election Day.

Guests

Mark DiCamillo, Director of The Field Poll

Joe Garofoli, San Francisco Chronicle Senior Political Writer

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

Park Elementary School in Hayward is a cheerful place. The halls are dotted with murals of tiny green handprints and scribbled-on schoolwork, and the principal makes her rounds through the halls helping kids tie their shoes.

Under CC license from Flickr user Katheirne Hitt, resized and recropped

 

Medical marijuana has been legal in California since the late 90’s, but this year, California voters will decide whether the drug will be legalized for recreational use.

Every Thursday through Election Day, Rose Aguilar will host a special second hour of Your Call at 11 a.m. focused on local and state elections, the voting system, and the democratic process in California.

Every Thursday through Election Day, Rose Aguilar will host a special second hour of Your Call at 11am focused on local and state elections, the voting system, and the democratic process in California.

City Visions: Is Prop 47 Working?

Dec 7, 2015
npr.org

Last November California voters passed Proposition 47, which downgraded some non-violent offenses from felonies to misdemeanors. Supporters say the measure has reduced incarceration and will save the state more than $150 million. But critics say it has caused crime to rise in some cities. 

California Criminal Law -- A discussion of recent reforms reshaping California's Criminal Justice System: Public Safety Realignment (reducing prison crowding); Proposition 47 (changing six low-level nonviolent crimes from felonies to misdemeanors); and Proposition 36 (changing California's Three Strikes Law).

City Visions: Can we fix Prop 13?

Jul 21, 2015

  

It’s widely known as the third rail of California politics, but is the time ripe for a change to Proposition 13? 

On the November 12th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’re discussing the current state of the drought. A dozen communities across the state are at risk of running out of water, and at least 700 households already lack access to running water. Farmers have left nearly a half-million acres of land unplanted. How will new groundwater regulations and Proposition 1 impact water usage? What do you want to know about the drought? Is it affecting your area? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

 

  

On the October 29th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a debate on Proposition 46, the ballot initiative that would raise the cap on damages in malpractice suits and enforce mandatory drug testing on doctors. Supporters of Proposition 46 argue that medical negligence is too common and pain and suffering damage awards are too low. Opponents say the initiative isn’t about protecting patients, but increasing medical lawsuit payouts to trial lawyers. Election Day is next week - what questions do you have on Proposition 46? It’s Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.

What Proposition 1 has in store for California's water

Oct 27, 2014
Under CC license from Flickr user Scott2342

When you go to vote next Tuesday, the first thing you’ll see in the list of state measures is Proposition 1. It’s also being called “the water bond”. And let’s get one thing straight right now – this bond won’t resolve the current drought. We can’t vote to make it rain.

But, Proposition 1 can make it rain in the form of $7.5 billion worth of funding for water projects around the state. These could include projects that recycle, conserve, and store more of the water we already have.

Debate/discussion of California Proposition 47

Oct 15, 2014

Debate/discussion of Proposition 47 -- Criminal Sentences, Misdemeanor Penalties, Initiative Statute. The measure reduces penalties for certain offenders  convicted of nonserious and nonviolent property and drug crimes.

Guests:  Jeff Rosen, District Attorney, Santa Clara County; Stephen Wagstaffe, District Attorney, San Mateo County; Dionne Wilson, Victims' Advocate for Crime Survivors for Safety & Justice; and Judge Eugene Hyman, Santa Clara County (Retired).

Listeners with questions for Chuck and his guests, please call 415-841-4134.

On the September 29th edition Your Call, we’ll have a debate about Proposition 1, the ballot initiative that would authorize a 7-and-a-half billion dollar state bond for water infrastructure projects. Proponents say Proposition 1 will clean up groundwater, expand recycling and storage capacity. Opponents say it’s too vague and does nothing to address long-term water shortages in California. It’s six weeks from Election Day - what questions do you have about Proposition 1?   Join the conversation with David Onek and you.

Guests:

Your Call: Is it time to reform Prop 13?

Jun 4, 2014

  

East Bay Express: Back in the closet

Apr 30, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

"I ... do? Wait, let me think about it."

Dec 16, 2013

Experts help homo and hetero couples weigh the pros and cons of getting married by year-end. Just because it's now legal for same-sex couples to marry in California and many other states, and the federal government must recognize those marriages, should you? There are financial advantages for some to get hitched by Dec. 31, but disadvantages for others, and there are many other potential risks and benefits.

Got a queer itch to hitch? On this hour-long call-in edition of Out in the Bay, analysis and reactions to the U.S. Supreme Court's decisions in the Proposition 8 and Defense of Marriage Act cases. What are the next political steps, and how will the rulings affect our lives on a practical basis? Join host Eric Jansen and his legal, financial and political expert guests for answers to your questions. Should you, or should you not tie the knot? Even with the Supreme Court's historic rulings, how are same-sex couples still legally different from hetero couples? Arm yourself with knowledge on this week's Out in the Bay.

The Supreme Court issued historic rulings on gay marriage today, dismissing an appeal by Prop 8 supporters and stating that married same-sex couples are entitled to the same federal benefits as opposite-sex ones. While the justices did not rule on the constitutionality of states’ rights to prohibit same-sex marriages or give guidance on the effect of their ruling, legal analysts believe today’s decision regarding Prop 8 will open the door for same-sex marriages in California.

Many three-strikes prisoners are getting a second chance in California since the passage of Prop 36. Back in November, 69 percent of Californians voted yes on the proposition to change the Three Strikes Law, which was enacted in 1994. It sentenced offenders with three or more felony convictions to 25 years to life in prison -- and comparatively minor crimes could qualify as the third strike. 

Nearly 500 inmates serving life sentences have been freed from California prisons since voters passed Proposition 36 last November. The law authorized Superior Court judges throughout the state to free prisoners who had been sentenced to 25 years to life under the state’s original three-strikes law if their third crime, or “strike,” wasn’t serious or violent, and thus, not a third strike.

What the election results mean for public education

Nov 29, 2012
Under CC license from Flickr user JoeInSoutherCA

This past election, San Franciscans voted on 18 state and local ballot initiatives. Arguably the biggest winner was public education.

On the state level, voters approved Proposition 30, which was a tax increase to fund K-12 programs and community colleges across the state. San Franciscans passed local Proposition A, establishing a more secure financial footing for City College.

KALW’s education reporter, Jen Chien, reports on how these measures will be rolled out and what their impact on public education will likely be.

  On the next Your Call, we’ll talk about recent gains by the Democratic Party in California’s legislature.  Democrats have had the majority in California since 1970.  But 8 years later, Prop 13 came along, requiring 2/3 majority vote for any decision to raise taxes.  Now for the first time since Prop 13, the Democrats have a 2/3 majority.  So what will Democrats do with their new power? Join us at 10am Pacific or post a comment here.  What do you hope for California’s new congress? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Teachers relieved by Prop 30 results

Nov 7, 2012
http://www.examiner.com/article/school-and-building-evactuated-for-bomb-scare / Examiner

When she came into work this morning, Frank McCoppin kindergarten teacher Selina Cheung didn’t know whether she’d have a job next semester or not. Parent Siobhan Culhane hadn’t heard the news about Proposition 30 either.

Commentary: How the passage of Prop 36 can change lives

Nov 5, 2012

Proposition 36 would not only reserve life sentences for violent and serious felonies, it would also allow those serving life sentences for non-violent, non-serious felonies to apply for re-sentencing provided they have already served twice the normal sentence for their current crime. In order to be approved for re-sentencing, each person would have to demonstrate to a judge they are not a current danger to society. 

Pages