Barack Obama

Will Durst: Cold War 2

Mar 31, 2014

 Note: Will Durst is a comedian and you may find some of his material offensive, or worse, not funny. His views do not necessarily reflect those of KALW.

Hey guys,

WHAT YOU NEED TO PLAY:

 

Hey guys,

Will Durst here with a few choice words, about this - the beginning of the new year - and the grand old tradition of we professional commentators trotting out the tried but true 'ye olde predictions' piece. 

Note: Will Durst is a comedian and you may find some of his material offensive, or worse, not funny. His views do not necessarily reflect those of KALW.

Hey guys,

Will Durst: Zero Hero

Nov 11, 2013

Note: Will Durst is a comedian and you may find some of his material offensive, or worse, not funny. His views do not necessarily reflect those of KALW.

Hey guys,

Will Durst here with a few choice words about the liberal exodus off the presidential bandwagon - which is approaching klaxon fire drill evacuation levels.

 

Note: Will Durst is a comedian and you may find some of his material offensive, or worse, not funny. His views do not necessarily reflect those of KALW.

In the State of the Union address on Tuesday evening, President Obama touched on several issues that might have pricked the ears of his young supporters who were instrumental in getting him re-elected.

According to CIRCLE, young black and Hispanic women provided the strongest support for President Obama among young voters in 2012. Young black male voters also heavily supported the president, although more of them voted Republican than in 2008.

Live NPR coverage of the President’s address, hosted by Melissa Block.  She'll be joined in the studio by NPR National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson and Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving, with additional reporting and reaction from NPR correspondents Tamara Keith on the hill as well as policy reporter including David Welna on the federal budget, Julie Rovner on health, Tom Bowman on defense, and Elizabeth Shogren on climate, as well as analysis of the speeches from NPR correspondents and outside contributors.  Tuesday at 6pm.

Photo courtesy of Belva Davis.

The 2012 election marks the final significant broadcast for Bay Area trailblazing journalist Belva Davis. She’s come very far:

“When I was first applying for jobs in television, I had never seen a black television reporter,” Davis once said.

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the presidential debate.  This is the first of three before November's elections.  Mitt Romney and Barack Obama were asked questions focused on domestic policy.

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