Bayview

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Aug 19, 2015
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news.

Appeal to stop ‘excessive’ sand mining in SF Bay scheduled for next week // SF Examiner

“An environmental group will present arguments in an appeals court next week in what may be the group’s final legal effort to stop what it deems excessive sand mining in the San Francisco Bay.

Robert F. Oaks

 

San Francisco's reputation as one of America's most ethnically diverse cities is in question as its African Americans population erodes. In 1990, 11% of city residents were Black. Now that number is just 6% and is expected to drop below 4% by 2020.

Samuel F. B. Morse

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Michael Zelner

It’s Thursday, and do you know what you’re doing this weekend? If you don’t, fear not: I’ve got a list of go-to events that are open to everyone.

TaSin Sabir

Bayview has long been known as San Francisco’s industrial hub. But on Yosemite Street there’s an imposing brick building with a dance studio. Inside the space there's a group of young people who climb on pieces of welded iron that hang three feet off the ground. They run and mess around with each other during breaks. But their joviality turns to concentration when they get in the air. Up there they’re spinning, floating, and thriving.

Old Skool Cafe addresses new school problems

Jun 17, 2015

Old Skool Café is a 1940s-themed jazz supper club, run by young people. They cook the food, serve it to all guests, and perform their music, dance, and poetry onstage.  Working at the café, they get professional skills and a support network—all while dressed in their 1940s best.

Kyung Jin Lee

Sixty-eight-year-old Oscar James stands on a hill overlooking the old Hunters Point Shipyard. He points out a street that’s now closed off by a chain-link fence. That’s where his family lived on a street once called Navy Road. There’s a striking view of the bay side of the peninsula.

“All that dirt, see it behind the lab, the road?” he asks. “From that road all the way back used to be water.”

Kevin Jones

 

Around 20 teenagers are settling into a classroom at this year’s Bayview Youth Summit. After a few minutes, they’re quiet, eyes focused on someone their own age, who’s leading a Race and Racism workshop.

“This is like an example of how African Americans are portrayed in the media,” says a youth moderator. “Even in Disney.”

TaSin Sabir

The sun is beating down on Islais Creek, a small marine channel in Hunters Point that opens out into the Bay. Homeless camps, graffiti, and factories surround the area, but there’s also a small, quaint park with native cherry trees and a gravel boat launch. Bo Barnes, a laid back man with shoulder length hair and an easy smile, is getting ready to take me out kayaking on Islais Creek.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, March 26, 2015

Mar 26, 2015
Sophia Germer / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Major S.F. construction projects stalled by late glass deliveries // SF Chronicle

David Boyer

I was looking for a place just ahead of the tide of development in San Francisco. I found it at Third Street and Jerrold Avenue in the Bayview District. It's an intersection with one foot in the past and one in the future. On one side there’s a combination KFC/Taco Bell and an old Baptist church. On the other, there’s the new All Good Pizza and a non-profit co-founded by Steve Jobs’ widow, Laurene Powell Jobs. In The Intersection, I go corner by corner—and hear about life in the middle of a transition.

Pernilla Persson

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On a wide street full of work spaces, lined with cars and no trees in sight is the Dr. George W. Davis Senior Center. It’s the one building on the block where there’s constant activity. Laughter pours out of the cafeteria which for now has been turned into a dance floor. 

Bayview Opera House


This year marks the 125th birthday of a San Francisco historic Landmark. Not City Hall, not the Golden Gate. The Bayview Opera House — San Francisco’s oldest theatre. 

R.J. Lozada

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Deafening gunshots rang out just as James Martin arrived home. Troubled by the news of a 17-year-old young man dying in front of his house, he did what anyone would do – actually what most wouldn’t do. He grabbed his portable karaoke machine and stood at the sidewalk memorial erected for the young man and began singing, “Wake up everybody, no more sleeping in bed, no more backward thinking time for thinking ahead.”

Malaika Kambon

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At first glance, Raquel Miller has more than a few things in common with a Hollywood heiress. She wears her hair in long, soft curls or braids and she carries a bedazzled hello kitty iPhone case that matches her neon pink Nikes.

Laura Flynn

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Kevin B. Jones

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Having Pride rolls up to the plaza at Third and Oakdale with a mission: hit the bricks, and tell everyone they meet about the group’s job placement, food assistance, and GED programs.

As part of the monthly 3rd on Third neighborhood arts celebration, the San Francisco Arts Commission hosts a discussion with cultural activist Juan Fuentes and the former Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party Emory Douglas. The two will talk about the inextricable link between art and politics for them in the past and current work including Emory’s projects with the Zapatistas in Chiapas and Juan’s contributions to a nation-wide collective of Chicano/Latino printmakers.

Jen Chien

San Francisco’s Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood has higher rates of poverty, unemployment, and violence than any other part of the city. But its relative geographical isolation – it’s cut off by the 101 and 280 freeways – can make those issues all but invisible to residents of other neighborhoods.