Bayview Hunters Point

Leila Day

 

If you walk upstairs from the kitchen at Mother Brown’s drop-in center in the evening, you’ll find dozens of people sleeping in chairs. During the day, Mother Brown’s serves home-cooked meals to the homeless in San Francisco’s Bayview district. There are over a thousand people without homes in Bayview -- the second-highest homeless population in the city. But there’s not one shelter. So for more than a decade, Mother Brown’s has been offering chairs. Now they want to offer beds.

The San Francisco Shipyard: Undoing the toxic legacy

Jun 12, 2014
Luiza Leite

Marie Harrison is very familiar with the health issues in Bayview Hunters Point.

"I've lived and raised children in Bayview for almost 50 something years, and honestly for as long as I can remember there have always been complaints. Because no one really understood the relationship between their illnesses and where they lived," Harrison says.

The San Francisco Shipyard: Who gets the jobs?

Jun 11, 2014

Freddy Carter is working on block 51. This is one of the first buildings in the reinvention of the historic Hunters Point Shipyard that will come on the market.

Under CC license from Flickr user Chris D 2006

Linda Richardson is sitting in her car just outside a huge, fenced off, construction zone. This is where Lennar Urban is slowly building a new development at the site of the abandoned Navy shipyard. 12,000 homes by 2021. Richardson, a long time resident and community activist, wants to show me who will be most affected by the redevelopment.

flickr user freeside510

San Francisco is booming as construction cranes transform the city skyline. One of the most significant changes is happening at the Hunters Point Shipyard. It's a project so big, it seems like a whole new town is being built within the city. Residences, shops, parks, and high-rises are being built and will replace the naval shipyard – once a major source of employment, but dormant for years. 

Turning a healthy corner in the Bayview

Apr 11, 2013
SEFA

San Francisco is known as a Mecca for conscious foodies – with organic farmers markets, gourmet food trucks, and six Whole Foods supermarkets within the seven-by-seven square-mile city limits. But this abundance doesn’t reach everyone. In a lot of low-income areas, it can be difficult to find fresh and healthy food.