bees

Your Call: Bees and the powerful pesticide industry

Jun 23, 2016

On the June 23rd edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the pesticide industry and the drastic decline of the bee population.

Your Call: Bees and pesticides

Feb 1, 2016

On the February 1st edition Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about bees. Since 2006, honey bees and other pollinators have experienced rapid population declines.

Excerpt of an image from the Creative Commons account of barloventomagico

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW:

‘Killer bees’ found in the Bay Area for the first time // SF Gate

“An Africanized breed of honeybees — sometimes known as “killer bees” because of their swarming, aggressive and deadly nature when a colony is threatened — has found its way to the Bay Area for the first time, researchers say.

Daily news roundup for Monday, March 2, 2015

Mar 2, 2015
Laura A. Oda/Bay Area News Group

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Livermore Lab taking prosthetic arms to next level // Mercury News

"Once reserved for sci-fi heroes and far-fetched television shows, bionic arms that can communicate with the brain are under development at Lawrence Livermore Lab and five years away from human testing.

Making a home for bees by the freeway

Aug 28, 2014
Charlotte Silver

In a city that struggles to find enough space for housing, parking or children, a few dedicated people have found a luxurious, spacious and cheap home for bees.

East Bay Express: What's poisoning the bees

Jun 5, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Life of the Law: “Bad Constitution”  Alabama has the longest constitution, not just in the country, but in the world, with 885 amendments and counting.  Hear why it got that way, and how it affects everything in the state from school desegregation to pig farms.


Today on Your Call: Why are honeybees disappearing?

May 5, 2013

Planting a permanent culture in San Francisco

Jan 9, 2013

Carries Hughes stands on the sidewalk, near a chain link fence, on the corner of Fell and Laguna streets in San Francisco. Behind her, cars roar past the rows of tidy Victorians. But Hughes is more interested in the wide, sloping lot in front of us, on the other side of the fence. 

A spoonful of sugar may help the medicine go down. But what if the medicine itself were sweet?

People have taken honey through the centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments – including as an allergy suppressant. But can something that tastes that good really be a medicine?