Bevan Dufty

New partnership combats bullying

May 28, 2015
The Arc San Francisco

  

People with disabilities and LGBT folks are teaming up to fight bullying. There are many similarities in why and how people in different groups are bullied, and how to stand up to and overcome it. Eric Jansen's guests on Out in the Bay (7pm Thursday) are Dr. Glenn Motola, CEO of The Arc San Francisco, a learning center for adults with developmental disabilities in San Francisco, San Mateo and Marin Counties; Lance Scott, The Arc's Socialization Program Director and instructor of The Arc's anti-bullying classes; and Gabby Castro, an Arc client, peer leader and spokesperson for disability rights. The Arc's anti-bullying curriculum was inspired in part by workshops at the San Francisco Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Community Center.

March 29 was the last night Delilah Soto slept on the street. She’s a recovering heroin addict who’s been living in a tent in San Francisco’s Mission District with her girlfriend, Rocky Anderson, and their dog Sparta. That night, she learned they had another choice.

Nearby, 1950 Mission St. was dead space. A closed-down school site sitting on premium San Francisco real estate, begging to be repurposed. On March 30, the gates opened on a new pilot program called the “Navigation Center”.

City Visions host Joseph Pace speaks with Bevan Dufty, Director of Housing Opportunities, Partnerships and Engagement, about what his office is doing to enhance homeless services -- and the complex challenges that persist in helping people to leave the streets.

Links:

San Francisco’s Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness: Anniversary Report 2004 to 2014

Leila Day

 

If you walk upstairs from the kitchen at Mother Brown’s drop-in center in the evening, you’ll find dozens of people sleeping in chairs. During the day, Mother Brown’s serves home-cooked meals to the homeless in San Francisco’s Bayview district. There are over a thousand people without homes in Bayview -- the second-highest homeless population in the city. But there’s not one shelter. So for more than a decade, Mother Brown’s has been offering chairs. Now they want to offer beds.

Bevan Dufty is Director of Housing, Opportunity, Partnership, and Engagement for the city of San Francisco. In his new role brainstorming solutions to the city’s stubborn homelessness problem, Dufty has come up with some pretty novel thoughts. We wanted to hear about some of the most innovative, so we invited him in for a segment we call “Radical Ideas.”

Mary Rees

As California sloshes through its rainy season, homeless people around the Bay Area are looking for places to stay dry. In San Francisco, the spaces under freeways are popular, and groups of homeless people sometimes band together for their mutual protection. Still, as you might expect, living on the streets isn’t safe or easy.

Mariel Waloff

Finding an apartment in San Francisco these days is an uphill battle on any kind of budget. Craigslist ads and open houses can provoke hundreds of responses from people ready to compete for their share of the city’s scarce square footage, even at times willing to pay for months of rent in advance. For people without cash, things are a lot harder. Among those who find it most difficult are chronically homeless veterans.