Black Panthers

Photo courtesy of Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch

The Black Panthers started in North Oakland in the fall of 1966. Their very visible public presence marked a change of pace during the Civil Rights movement - from giving out free breakfast to children to entering the California State Assembly with loaded rifles, shotguns and pistols.

Stephen Shames

 On the October 1st edition of Your Call, film director Stanley Nelson joins us to talk about his new documentary, The Black Panthers, Vanguard of the Revolution

Your Call: What is revolutionary today?

Nov 4, 2014


On the November 4th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with the Black Panthers co-founder Bobby Seale, and the artistic director of Party People, a new play at Berkeley Rep. Party People reflects on the history of the Black Panther Party and the Young Lords, a Puerto Rican immigrant rights movement that called for independence. What can we learn from their radical histories? And what is considered a revolutionary act today? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.


Photo courtesy of Belva Davis.

The 2012 election marks the final significant broadcast for Bay Area trailblazing journalist Belva Davis. She’s come very far:

“When I was first applying for jobs in television, I had never seen a black television reporter,” Davis once said.

A People's Archive of the Bay Area

Aug 15, 2012
Chris Carlsson

You who are living, what have you done with these treasures?

Do you regret the time of my struggle?

Have you raised your crops for a common harvest?

Have you made my town a richer place?

--Robert Desnos, a member of the French Resistance