Bollywood

Fog City Blues: Aki Kumar + extra hour

Sep 21, 2016

Aki Kumar, the world's first professional blues harmonica player to hail from India, kicks off a special three-hour edition of Fog City Blues.

An iconic Indian "Bollywood" film reminds Sandip Roy that a solid relationship can transcend the oceanic gap of language.

July 2, 2014: R.D. Burman would have turned 75 last week and Bollywood threw a great birthday bash. Sandip and Kronos Quartet violinist David Harrington remember the great Burman.

This is a story about two films that are in the eye of a peculiar storm in India. One is called Gulaab Gang. The other is called Gulaabi Gang with an "I." But in that single "I" lies a world of difference.

It may have been passed over for an Oscar nomination, but the New York Times calls The Lunchbox a Bollywood anomaly - a quiet movie of unexpressed anguish and yearning instead of movies that clutch viewers by the throat and assault them with glamour, pizazz and dancing. But what’s really surprising about The Lunchbox is it actually really made a splash in India with a love story so low key, so subtle, one can hardly call it a romance. The lovers don’t meet. They just exchange notes in a...

I Love You Box

Sep 25, 2013
Wikipedia

L ove in India is often over the top. In the weekly magazine Open I read about a 30-year old lawyer in the town of Patna. He leaves I love you notes for his girlfriend written in blood. But he doesn’t slit his wrists to do it because he says one needs to be innovative, not stupid. So it’s a little surprising to find a Hindi film making a splash with a love story so low key, so subtle, one can hardly call it a romance. The lovers don’t meet. They just exchange notes in a lunchbox. Real...

Indian Cinema Turns 100!

May 15, 2013
khwahishen-aisi.blogspot.com

On May 3 1913 D G Phalke stunned Indians with Raja Harishchandra, a melodramatic mythological film he called a performance with 57,000 photographs. He hardly imagined he was giving birth to the biggest film industry in the world.

Most Westerners have been exposed to Bollywood, the lively cinematic musical-soap-operas that are iconic to the movie industry in Mumbai, India. However, few have gone beyond the screen and experienced first-hand the infectious music and dance that inspire some of the famous scenes from Bollywood films.