"Ranger on marijuana grows eradication duty" by Park Ranger licensed under CC BY-NC-SA, cropped from the original

Advocates of legalizing marijuana in California received some encouraging news this week: On Monday a broad coalition of supporters, including Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, announced that they’re backing a 2016 ballot measure.

Under CC license from Flickr user: Akash Mathotra

Banking for dispensaries moves ahead… Blue Ribbon panel presents… There’s an app, but not on Google… Canadian cannabis heading our way?  And more.


Daily news roundup for Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Jul 1, 2015
Rich Pedroncelli / AP

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

What's Next For California's Contentious Vaccine Law // AP

Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a hotly contested California bill to impose one of the strictest school vaccination laws in the country in the wake of an outbreak of measles at Disneyland late last year.



On the May 6th edition of Your Call, we continue our weeklong series on California’s water crisis by talking about the $110 billion bottled water industry.


Cannabis goes to Congress… Nevada first state with 2016 ballot measure… “I speak for the salmon”…  Business news… Lawyer drops baggy in court room… and more.


What do you want to know about California’s new groundwater law? On the next Your Call, we’ll continue our weeklong series on California’s water crisis by talking about the state’s first-ever rules for pumping groundwater in California. Nearly 40 percent of California’s water comes from underground sources. About 30 million Californians rely on groundwater for their drinking water. But areas are being pumped faster than they are being replenished. How is groundwater managed now? And what changes should we expect? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Feb 10, 2015
Dan Brekke / KQED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Locally and Nationally, renters pay dearly to cut commutes // SF GATE

Daily news roundup for Monday, February 9 , 2015

Feb 9, 2015
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Angela Johnston


Rosa Santos is leaning over a pile of forms and documents in the corner of the San Jose’s new DMV. I meet her along with her friend. They’re both applying for their licenses for the first time through AB 60.

Santos came prepared today. She studied for hours, pouring over YouTube tutorials and sample driver's tests. As she waits in line, she riffles through the documents she needs -  a Mexican ID, a piece of mail to confirm her address, and $33 for the processing fee.

Bilha Sperling

The new play Faulted follows one character’s prediction of the next big California earthquake, and her struggle to convince everyone else before it’s too late.

KALW's Julie Caine spoke to Evren Odcikin, the play's director, and Deborah Eliezer, who plays the lead role of "Aurora" in the show, about what it means to face one of our biggest collective fears.

The show opens November 14. Click here for more information.

To hear the full interview, click on the audio player above.

On the November 12th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’re discussing the current state of the drought. A dozen communities across the state are at risk of running out of water, and at least 700 households already lack access to running water. Farmers have left nearly a half-million acres of land unplanted. How will new groundwater regulations and Proposition 1 impact water usage? What do you want to know about the drought? Is it affecting your area? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.




On the October 29th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a debate on Proposition 46, the ballot initiative that would raise the cap on damages in malpractice suits and enforce mandatory drug testing on doctors. Supporters of Proposition 46 argue that medical negligence is too common and pain and suffering damage awards are too low. Opponents say the initiative isn’t about protecting patients, but increasing medical lawsuit payouts to trial lawyers. Election Day is next week - what questions do you have on Proposition 46? It’s Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.

Under CC license from Flickr user Scott2342

When you go to vote next Tuesday, the first thing you’ll see in the list of state measures is Proposition 1. It’s also being called “the water bond”. And let’s get one thing straight right now – this bond won’t resolve the current drought. We can’t vote to make it rain.

But, Proposition 1 can make it rain in the form of $7.5 billion worth of funding for water projects around the state. These could include projects that recycle, conserve, and store more of the water we already have.

(Rich Pedroncelli / AP)



On the October 2nd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss bills that impact everything from labor and education to groundwater and healthcare. Governor Brown just signed the country’s first ban on single-use plastic bags. He also signed bills to give workers 3 sick days a year, redefine sexual consent on college campuses, and extend housing to foster youth up to age 25 if they are completing a secondary education. What bills are you watching? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.




On the September 2nd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation about the bills
that have recently passed in the California state legislature. These bills would affect everything from healthcare and paid sick leave to sexual harassment to plastic bags. Governor Jerry Brown has until the end of September to either sign or veto legislation. He recently signed legislation to put a $7.5 billion water bond before voters. What  bills are you following? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Lawyers have an ethics code. Journalists have an ethics code. Architects do, too.

According to Ethical Standard 1.4 of the American Institute of Architects (AIA):  "Members should uphold human rights in all their professional endeavors." 

Fracking California: Can Jerry Brown be a climate leader if he does not oppose fracking?

Jun 17, 2014
Lisa Morehouse

When Jerry Brown stepped up to the microphone at the California Democratic Party’s convention in March, it looked like it might be an environmental love-fest. He was kicking off his campaign for a fourth term as governor of the state that is perhaps the world’s leading environmental trend-setter.

Your Call: Is it time to reform Prop 13?

Jun 4, 2014


Flickr user Public Citizen


Trade representatives from twelve countries have been discussing the Trans-Pacific Partnership for four years. They’re discussing removing tariffs, protecting the environment, and stopping the piracy of copyrighted  material - all in the name of freer international trade.

Not much is known about what’s in this agreement, but based on what’s been leaked, here’s what we think we know about a couple of key components that will affect Californians: cows and computers.

On the farm




At 49 years of age, Michael Santos is getting his first taste of college. He's walking through the main quad at San Francisco State, beaming like a kid.

“I always come to soak up the university vibe that I missed when I was a teenager and in my early ‘20s,” he says.

Santos is not a student or a visitor. He’s a lecturer in the Criminal Justice Department, a job he landed in September, just two weeks after his release from 26 years in prison.

Prison Life

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with the authors of The Atlas of California: Mapping the Challenges of a New Era. From public health and education to the water crisis to foreclosure crisis, California often leads the nation on policies for better or for worse.  So as environmental, economic, and societal realities shift, what kind of future do we hope for in California?  Join the conversation on the next Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.



Intersection for the Arts

California has been called the most diverse state in the country. People come from across the world to make their homes here.  People of color now make up about 60% of the state’s population, and 112 languages are spoken in the Bay Area alone.

The Califas Festival -- which runs through November 17 -- is a multidisciplinary arts celebration that seeks to tell some of the stories of this multifaceted state of ours. The festival presents both professional and non-professional artists, and is put on by the Triangle Lab, a collaboration between Intersection for the Arts in San Francisco and California Shakespeare Theater in Orinda. KALW’s Hana Baba sat down with Rebeka Rodriguez of Intersection for the Arts to find out more.

For the past decade, California has been a leader in the clean-energy revolution. Groundbreaking state laws require our major utilities to purchase 33 percent of their power from renewable sources by 2020. And some green-energy experts expect that mandate to rise to 50 percent or more in the following decade. To date, the rapid growth of solar and wind power has fueled the move to renewables. But for California to fulfill its green-energy future, it must solve an important problem: how to deliver electricity to consumers when the sun isn't shining and the wind isn't blowing.