california

  

  

At 49 years of age, Michael Santos is getting his first taste of college. He's walking through the main quad at San Francisco State, beaming like a kid.

“I always come to soak up the university vibe that I missed when I was a teenager and in my early ‘20s,” he says.

Santos is not a student or a visitor. He’s a lecturer in the Criminal Justice Department, a job he landed in September, just two weeks after his release from 26 years in prison.

Prison Life

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with the authors of The Atlas of California: Mapping the Challenges of a New Era. From public health and education to the water crisis to foreclosure crisis, California often leads the nation on policies for better or for worse.  So as environmental, economic, and societal realities shift, what kind of future do we hope for in California?  Join the conversation on the next Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.
 

  

  

Intersection for the Arts


California has been called the most diverse state in the country. People come from across the world to make their homes here.  People of color now make up about 60% of the state’s population, and 112 languages are spoken in the Bay Area alone.

The Califas Festival -- which runs through November 17 -- is a multidisciplinary arts celebration that seeks to tell some of the stories of this multifaceted state of ours. The festival presents both professional and non-professional artists, and is put on by the Triangle Lab, a collaboration between Intersection for the Arts in San Francisco and California Shakespeare Theater in Orinda. KALW’s Hana Baba sat down with Rebeka Rodriguez of Intersection for the Arts to find out more.

For the past decade, California has been a leader in the clean-energy revolution. Groundbreaking state laws require our major utilities to purchase 33 percent of their power from renewable sources by 2020. And some green-energy experts expect that mandate to rise to 50 percent or more in the following decade. To date, the rapid growth of solar and wind power has fueled the move to renewables. But for California to fulfill its green-energy future, it must solve an important problem: how to deliver electricity to consumers when the sun isn't shining and the wind isn't blowing.


Note: Will Durst is a comedian and you may find some of his material offensive, or worse, not funny. His views do not necessarily reflect those of KALW.  

Hey guys,

Will Durst here with a few choice words about California, which is so incredibly superior to every other state in the union, that it's not even close to funny, right? We don't mean to sound conceited, it's just hard when you're so much better than everyone.

Today on Your Call: How does Medi-Cal work?

Jul 25, 2013

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