CCSF

Jen Chien

 


 

City College of San Francisco has gotten something of a reprieve these last few weeks. First, San Francisco Superior Court Judge Curtis Karnow tentatively ruled that the ACCJC – the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges – had violated the law when it moved to terminate the school’s accreditation in 2013. Then, last week, California’s Community College Board of Governors removed the commission’s monopoly on the accreditation of schools in the state.

Paul Fain is a reporter for the journal “Inside Higher Ed.” KALW's Jen Chien asked him what Judge Karnow’s ruling means for the school and the commission.

CCSF

City College of San Francisco is now able to stay open for another two years while it meets accreditation standards, according to the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges.

This is a relief for the college which has feared closure since last July, when the commission decided to terminate the college’s accreditation this coming July.

Jen Chien

KALW's Jen Chien sat down with Crosscurrents host Holly Kernan to talk about what's going on off-campus to support CCSF's survival.

www.ccsf.edu

 

Robert Agrella was appointed by the California Community Colleges Board of Governors to advise City College of San Francisco's seven-member board of trustees just over a year ago. But in July, when the college was told it would remain on "show cause" status for another year, the state effectively disbanded the board, and gave Agrella sole decision-making authority. His full title now is "Special Trustee with Extraordinary Powers".

Agrella is an experienced administrator, and a former president of several community colleges, most recently at Sonoma and Santa Rosa. He sat down with KALW’s Ben Trefny, who asked him what exactly his administration is doing to save the school.

Jen Chien

For more information on off-campus CCSF supporters, click here.

“Open, Accredited, and Ready for You!” That’s what it says on the big electronic billboard at the entrance to City College’s main Ocean Avenue Campus. Despite ongoing troubles over the last year and a half, the school is still fully operational and remains fully accredited. Students crowd the walkways in between classes, and the atmosphere feels like any other busy college campus.

Jen Chien

City College of San Francisco serves over 85,000 students every year. The diversity of the student body reflects the vibrancy of the city. Here are just a few of those students' voices.

Click on the players above to listen.

CCSF Veterans Alliance

Aundray Rogers spent eight years in the Army – serving in Iraq, Kosovo and Kuwait – before returning to civilian life five years ago. He's now the president of the Veterans Alliance and the Veterans Resource Center at City College of San Francisco, which currently serves about 1,300 student veterans.

For  the past year and a half we’ve been covering the troubles facing City College of San Francisco – the college has until this coming July to meet a set of  requirements, or its accreditation could be revoked. This could leave thousands of students in the lurch-- City College is California’s largest community college. One of the largest in the country, in fact, with enrollment between 70 and 80 thousand students. Later this week, we’re going to devote an entire show to this issue, but today we’re bringing you the story of just one of City College’s many students.


The story at City College of San Francisco has had a lot of twists and turns since last year, and the San Francisco Chronicle’s higher education reporter, Nanette Asimov, has been one of the public’s main sources for information on it. She sat down with KALW’s Ben Trefny to talk about how the school got to where it is today, and where it’s going next.

 

City College of San Francisco has been in the news quite a bit since July, when it received a very critical report from the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, throwing the college’s accreditation into question. Since that time, the college has been scrambling to plan and implement reforms based on the recommendations included in that report.

How can we save CCSF?

Sep 7, 2012

A special two-hour live broadcast of Your Call from the City College of San Francisco focusing on the crisis at CCSF, which is threatened with closure if it loses its accreditation.

PG&E insists that its current rates are reasonable despite the fact that the price of natural gas has dropped. Consumer advocates point out that PG&E should pass its savings onto customers and not use it for other sectors of the company budget...