Chinatown

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Jul 23, 2015
Treasure Island Development Authority

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news

City plans to transform Treasure Island with $50 million for public art // KQED

"In an art-themed version of the movie axiom, 'if you build it, they will come,' the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC) hopes to draw locals and tourists alike to Treasure Island — and not just for its views.

Jack Detsch / KALW

Three dollars and 25 cents won’t buy you a lot in today’s marketplace, but try to imagine what it might mean if you were a business owner in Oakland’s Chinatown, and you had to bump wages by that much for every hour worked.

The Upshot: Empress of China

May 11, 2015
Photo by: Carson Lancaster

In his recent article for the April issue of San Francisco Magazine, “Long Live the Empress,” journalist Andrew Leonard looked at the fate of Chinatown, and whether it’s on the brink of serious social and cultural change. The article focused on the close and sale of an iconic Chinese restaurant and banquet hall called the Empress of China. Once so popular that it was booked more than two years in advance, it’s now being advertised as an “ideal space for creative technology tenants.”

Courtesy of Grant Avenue Follies

From the 1940s until the 1960s, San Francisco’s Chinatown was home to a thriving Chinese American nightclub scene. The clubs had names like Forbidden City, the Chinese Skyroom, and the Shanghai Low. They had showgirls, ballroom duos, comedians, jazz singers, and magic acts -- all featuring Asian-American entertainers. These clubs had wide appeal: celebrities like Bing Crosby, Duke Ellington, and Lauren Bacall were all spotted over the years, along with tourists, businessmen and locals.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Apr 28, 2015
SF EXAMINER FILE PHOTO

Chinatown opera musicians seek solution to repeated citations // SF Examiner

The ongoing drama of Chinese opera singers and musicians performing without permits at Portsmouth Square in Chinatown might have a happy ending one day, if the group’s self-proclaimed guardian can drum up enough support for a new arrangement.

Sandip Roy: 9-Man

Mar 18, 2015

If you think Asian-Amerian man, chances are you don’t think of sweaty guys pushing, shoving and shouting on a court. But that’s exactly what 9-Man is and has been since the 1930s. 

A new documentary by film maker Ursula Liang explores the game that became volleyball.  

Daily news roundup for Monday, February 9 , 2015

Feb 9, 2015
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Jan 28, 2015
Bert Johnson / East Bay Express

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Artists Create Two-Way Video Portal for Oaklanders to Meet Their Neighbors // East Bay Express

 

We don’t build housing projects like we used to anymore. It used to be big, labyrinthine complexes like Marcy Houses in New York, Cabrini Green in Chicago, and Geneva Towers in San Francisco. Today, conversations about development have to do with mixed-use, mixed-income communities. Much of the change has to do with how cities now think about urbanism. And a lot has to do with how affordable housing gets funded.

Chinatown Tenants Gather Strength

Jul 15, 2014
Melanie Young

Tenants are facing a tough time in San Francisco. The city has some of the nation’s highest rents and laws like the Ellis Act have made evictions front page news. But there are pockets of affordability, like in Chinatown, where the average rent is one third as much as in other neighborhoods.  

But the neighborhood is also one of the country’s most overcrowded and tenants claim that landlords violate health and safety codes.

Courtesy of Grant Avenue Follies

From the 1940s until the 1960s, San Francisco’s Chinatown was home to a thriving Chinese American nightclub scene. The clubs had names like Forbidden City, the Chinese Skyroom, and the Shanghai Low. They had showgirls, ballroom duos, comedians, jazz singers, and magic acts -- all featuring Asian-American entertainers. These clubs had wide appeal: celebrities like Bing Crosby, Duke Ellington, and Lauren Bacall were all spotted over the years, along with tourists, businessmen and locals.

Photo courtesy StoryCorps

 

Patricia Chin was born in San Francisco’s Chinatown.  She had never left the neighborhood when she auditioned to be a chorus girl. It was quite a leap for a young Asian-American girl, born in 1935, but Chin loved the adventure, and saw it as a way to bring home extra money. Her group, the Chinese Vanities, performed in nightclubs up and down the West Coast.

Julie Caine

It’s a chilly morning in San Francisco, and a funeral is starting.

Photo by Jean-Fabien. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jfl/4329536223/

In the 1980s, newspapers were regularly reporting on growing Asian gang problems in Oakland and in 1981 the Oakland police department created a special unit to address the issue.

Once the unit was formed the focus of the department was to develop trust between law enforcement and the Chinatown community.