City College of San Francisco

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Mar 24, 2015

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Oakland Mural Artists Create a Mural Project to Honor Women Affected By Violence // Oakland North

Jen Chien



City College of San Francisco has gotten something of a reprieve these last few weeks. First, San Francisco Superior Court Judge Curtis Karnow tentatively ruled that the ACCJC – the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges – had violated the law when it moved to terminate the school’s accreditation in 2013. Then, last week, California’s Community College Board of Governors removed the commission’s monopoly on the accreditation of schools in the state.

Paul Fain is a reporter for the journal “Inside Higher Ed.” KALW's Jen Chien asked him what Judge Karnow’s ruling means for the school and the commission.

A starting place for former foster youth

Mar 17, 2014
Rachel Wong

Dejon Lewis was 11 years old when child protective services arrived to take him and his twin sister away from their mother, whom he says is a drug addict. But instead of giving themselves over to the state, the two children made a run for it. Lewis says they stayed with a family friend for a while, but eventually they turned themselves in, and that’s when he entered the foster care system. Since then, Lewis has bounced around a lot.

“It’s hard to live when you’re just living with strangers and strangers and strangers, and no relatives. But I know down the road that that wouldn’t last forever, so I had to figure out how to be more independent,” he says.

Jen Chien

KALW's Jen Chien sat down with Crosscurrents host Holly Kernan to talk about what's going on off-campus to support CCSF's survival.


Robert Agrella was appointed by the California Community Colleges Board of Governors to advise City College of San Francisco's seven-member board of trustees just over a year ago. But in July, when the college was told it would remain on "show cause" status for another year, the state effectively disbanded the board, and gave Agrella sole decision-making authority. His full title now is "Special Trustee with Extraordinary Powers".

Agrella is an experienced administrator, and a former president of several community colleges, most recently at Sonoma and Santa Rosa. He sat down with KALW’s Ben Trefny, who asked him what exactly his administration is doing to save the school.

Jen Chien

For more information on off-campus CCSF supporters, click here.

“Open, Accredited, and Ready for You!” That’s what it says on the big electronic billboard at the entrance to City College’s main Ocean Avenue Campus. Despite ongoing troubles over the last year and a half, the school is still fully operational and remains fully accredited. Students crowd the walkways in between classes, and the atmosphere feels like any other busy college campus.

Jen Chien

City College of San Francisco serves over 85,000 students every year. The diversity of the student body reflects the vibrancy of the city. Here are just a few of those students' voices.

Click on the players above to listen.

Rai Sue Sussman

On Wednesday, the state chancellor’s office announced that the City College of San Francisco will lose its accreditation effective July 2014, pending a review and appeal.


The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges voted to revoke CCSF’s accreditation, meaning the college will no longer be “quality assured” or eligible for federal and state funding. Without the funding, the college will probably shut down.

The story at City College of San Francisco has had a lot of twists and turns since last year, and the San Francisco Chronicle’s higher education reporter, Nanette Asimov, has been one of the public’s main sources for information on it. She sat down with KALW’s Ben Trefny to talk about how the school got to where it is today, and where it’s going next.

Mary Willis

A decision is due today on the issue of whether City College of San Francisco will lose its accreditation. City College of San Francisco students, teachers, and staff launched a rally outside City Hall on Thursday to express their growing concerns with the college's administration and possible shutdown.

Under CC license from Flickr user Sam T

The department of LGBTQ studies at City College of San Francisco, the first queer studies department in the U.S., founded in 1978, is facing consolidation. Professor Ardel Thomas heads the Department. KALW’s Hana Baba asked her what would happen if consolidation is carried out.

Click the audio player above to listen to the interview.

Ali Budner

San Francisco’s Measure A passed yesterday, which means City College will get much needed funds. Prop 30 also passed, meaning Californians taxed themselves more than 6 billion dollars to help pay for public education.

City College of San Francisco is one of the city's most vital public institutions, serving 90,000 students at nine different campuses. But it's facing some tough times right now, with threats to its accreditation looming, and continuing cuts to its budget.

This November, four seats are open for election on the College's Board of Trustees, the body that may determine the fate of City College.

As part of our joint series with New America Media, every Tuesday until election day, Crosscurrents will be speaking with representatives from local ethnic media to hear about what’s important to their audiences this election season.

Jen Chien

In recent years, all levels of California’s public education system have been suffering from continuing budget cuts. City College of San Francisco, California’s largest community college has not been immune to these troubles. But right now it's facing an even bigger challenge, as the school fights to maintain its accreditation.  KALW Education reporter Jen Chien spoke with Ben Trefny about the situation.