civil rights

On the October 6th edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss new museums and exhibits that tell the story of African-American history.

Photo courtesy of Diamond Davis


Football players from Mission High School in San Francisco made headlines across the country when the team, as a unit, refused to stand for the national anthem, in protest against the oppression of people of color in the U.S.

Courtesy Evangelist Alveda King

This week we’ve been bringing you stories from the families of revolutionaries. And we conclude this series with Alveda King, the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Bob Hsiang


Yuri Kochiyama was known as one of the most fearless activists of her time. She was the daughter of Japanese immigrants, and spent time in an internment camp in the 1940’s.

Sweet Honey In The Rock on MLK weekend!

Jan 15, 2016

For Martin Luther King weekend, join us for music and conversation with Sweet Honey founder Bernice Johnson Reagon tomorrow (this Saturday) at 3 pm on "Folk Music & Beyond." She talks about how Sweet Honey got started and the many musical influences that form the basis of Sweet Honey's music. Reagon also talks at length about her activism in the 60's civil rights and social justice movements.  This program is available on-demand one week after the original broadcast on KALW's Local Music Player by clicking on the "Music & Arts" tab on the homepage.

StoryCorps: The fight for disability rights

Jul 14, 2015


Protest has long been a part of Bay Area culture, from the recent Black Lives Matter marches to the AIDS activists of the '90s, to the anti-war demonstrators of the '60s and '70s.



Civil rights veteran Vincent Harding is remembered by “On Being” host Krista Tippett. Harding, who passed away last May at the age of 82, had a long lens of wisdom on how social change happens. He believed America is still a developing nation when it comes to creating a multi-religious, multi-racial democracy, and spent recent decades bringing young people into creative contact with elders and civil rights veterans.  Monday, 1/19 at 7pm.

On the December 18th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with activists about how this movement is organizing for lasting change. Last weekend, tens of thousands of people across the country marched to protest the shooting of black men. BlackLivesMatter is also receiving international attention and support. What is the end goal of this movement? And what will it take to get there? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Got a queer itch to hitch? On this hour-long call-in edition of Out in the Bay, analysis and reactions to the U.S. Supreme Court's decisions in the Proposition 8 and Defense of Marriage Act cases. What are the next political steps, and how will the rulings affect our lives on a practical basis? Join host Eric Jansen and his legal, financial and political expert guests for answers to your questions. Should you, or should you not tie the knot? Even with the Supreme Court's historic rulings, how are same-sex couples still legally different from hetero couples? Arm yourself with knowledge on this week's Out in the Bay.

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about the year 1968 and why it was such a watershed moment.  Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4th, 1968.  In the same year: The Tet Offensive killed tens of thousands in Vietnam.  Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated.  Women threw their bras into a public trash can to protest the Miss America Pageant.  Apollo 8 orbited the moon.  A current exhibit at the Oakland Museum highlights the events of 1968.

Alexi Nunn Freeman, a lawyer for the Advancement Project, told us a story about five year-old Ja’eisha Scott who was arrested by the police in her kindergarten classroom for having a temper tantrum. This sounds extreme; but according to Freeman, it is part of a recent national trend.