climate change

Daily news roundup for Monday, June 22, 2015

Jun 22, 2015
Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Oakland Claims Record for Soul Train Line // Inside Bay Area
"OAKLAND -- We already know Oakland's got soul. Now, the city apparently has the distinction of holding the world record for a "Soul Train"-style dance line.

On the June 2nd edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the United States’ energy landscape. According to the World Bank, 80 to 85 percent of the energy consumed in the US is from fossil fuels. What are the economic, social and environmental costs of our dependency on fossil fuel and what will it take to transition to renewable energy? What are real alternatives to oil? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Richard Heinberg, senior fellow at Post Carbon Institute

Climate change--one view is doom and gloom and destruction. The other is that things could be far more beautiful and regenerative and sustainable and socially just than we can imagine. Is climate change an inevitability or an opportunity? Our guests are Shana Rappaport and Amanda Ravenhill of Project Drawdown, and Julia Prochnik, consultant to the National Resource Defense Council.

Women negotiating climate change. That's our inflection point.  

Your Call: What is the cost of burning coal?

Apr 22, 2015

  

What is the cost of burning coal? On the April 22nd edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Richard Martin, author of Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet. Coal has become a battleground in the fight against climate change. Martin traveled to Wyoming, West Virginia, and China to meet people on the front lines of the war on coal. He asks: Can we shut down Big Coal in time to save the planet – and ourselves? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guest: 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/matt_hintsa/

Twice a week, the Heart of the City Farmers Market transforms San Francisco’s gritty United Nations Plaza with dozens of white canopies and truckloads of fresh produce. But on a recent sunny winter Wednesday, the abundance of sweet-smelling fruits and vegetables are contrasted by a gloomy point.

It didn’t rain once here last January. Not in this spot, nor in all of San Francisco.

Flickr / klem@s

  

Your Call: How bad is California’s drought?

Mar 15, 2015

On the March 16th edition of Your Call, we’ll kick off a weeklong series on California’s water crisis. January was the driest month in the state since record keeping began in 1895 and February was the hottest. The fact is, it’s just not raining. As a result, California has just one year of water reserves, wells are running dry, and the Sierra snowpack is far below normal. What explains this? How are state officials dealing with the drought? And what’s the responsibility of citizens? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Hopcraft Communications

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

S.F. woman with leukemia sues for right to die at home // SF Gate

“When Brittany Maynard’s brain was racked with terminal cancer, the 29-year-old East Bay woman went to Oregon, where she could legally receive a doctor’s aid in dying a peaceful death. Christie White, a leukemia-stricken 53-year-old San Francisco woman, is going to court.

http://ca.water.usgs.gov/

To what extent is climate change causing or worsening California's drought, and how is the drought similar to other extreme weather events like superstorm Sandy? Columbia University climatologist Adam Sobel joins us to talk about the current drought, its causes, and how we can manage the increasing risk of future natural disasters.

Guest:

Adam H. Sobel, Professor of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University. He is also the author of Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate, and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.

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