climate change

Global climate change confronts us not only with well-known pragmatic challenges, but also with less commonly acknowledged moral challenges. Who is responsible for responding to environmental catastrophes around the world? What kind of help does the industrialized world owe developing nations? What values should we hold onto, and which must we discard, in response to the changing climate?

On the October 10th edition of  Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of the protests in Hong Kong over China’s decision to manage Hong Kong's next chief executive election. We’ll also talk about the economics of climate change. How are greenhouse gases affecting the global economy? We’ll be joined by investigative journalist Mark Schapiro and former NPR and BBC China correspondent Mary Kay Magistad. Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you

Guests:

Your Call Weekly Kudos: Sept, 26th 2014

Sep 26, 2014

Every week on Your Call's Friday Media Roundtable, we ask the journalists on our panel to recommend great reporting they've seen this week.

This week we spoke with:

Guests:

Suzanne Goldenberg, US environment correspondent of the Guardian

Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for the Financial Times

Jonathan Landay, national security and intelligence reporter for McClatchy Newspapers

Kudos of the week:

 

  

On the September 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call, Naomi Klein talks about her new book, “This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate”.  Klein says our current economic system can’t cut greenhouse emissions fast enough to prevent permanent warming.  As world leaders converge for the UN Climate Summit, is there still time to make the shift to sustainability?  And what would sustainability mean for the way we live?  Naomi Klein – on the next Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.    

Guest:

Port of SF

From Fisherman's Wharf to India Basin, what's next for San Francisco's waterfront? Host Joseph Pace and guests discuss the Port of San Francisco's newly released waterfront use plan. How does the plan address voter-imposed height limits? And how will future development contend with rising sea levels and other climate impacts?

Guests:

-Byron Rhett, deputy director of planning and development, Port of San Francisco

Laura Flynn

The east side story

I’m on the east side of Alameda Island, standing in mud in front of a storm drain that empties out into San Leandro Bay. There’s a stretch of homes right on the shoreline looking out at estuaries, the Oakland Airport, and Coliseum. The waterline isn’t quite at my feet right now, but in less than a century I’d likely be standing in water up to my shoulders.

  

The problems San Francisco’s facing today could really change the course of the city’s future. Local author Annalee Newitz says that future is something we should start trying to protect right now. Newitz wrote the new book Scatter, Adapt, and Remember: How Humans Will Survive a Mass Extinction. She describes it as an “optimistic book about extinction.” In it, she looks at how humans could deal with a catastrophe along the lines of what killed the dinosaurs. She says one thing we need is strong, resilient cities – and that San Francisco is a model for the world. Newitz spoke with KALW’s Casey Miner about adaptation, innovation, and what we can learn from the time local developers almost turned the Bay into a landfill.

Today on Your Call: Media Coverage of Climate Change

Jan 2, 2014


Today on Your Call: What are Transition Towns?

Nov 11, 2013


How much more water can the Bay Area conserve?

Mar 28, 2013
www5.sfgov.org

Advocates say that by mid-century the Bay Area will not have enough water to meet its needs without increasing supply or curbing demand. What more can local agencies and consumers do to conserve water, and can conservation alone help us avoid extreme water scarcity? Is water too cheap? What will it take to convince us all to adopt more water-efficient practices?


Under CC license from Flickr user Matt McGee

When we talk about climate change, it’s easy to get stuck in our terrestrial mammal mindset. Let’s face it: most of us are total dry land chauvinists. The only time we even notice something’s happening to the ocean is when it’s gnawing away at our coastline. But something else is going on just beneath the surface. Certain sections of the ocean are losing oxygen – and that’s just as bad for sea creatures as it would be for us.

Today On Your Call: Friday Media Roundtable

Jan 25, 2013

On the next Your Call, it's our Friday media roundtable. This week, we'll discuss coverage of the ongoing civil war in Syria as well as the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. We'll also look at the latest developments and coverage of the Keystone XL oil pipeline. Where did you see the best reporting this week? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Fred Weir, the Moscow correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor.   

Kate Sheppard,  staff reporter for Mother Jones' Washington bureau. 

On Your Call, Thursday December 20th we aired a pre-taped conversation looking back at climate change activism over the last year.  What strides have we made? Where have we fallen short?  The UN climate talks in Doha, Qatar this month didn’t seem to move the international community any closer to solutions.  So what needs to be done?  Can local actions make a difference?  What are we facing for climate change in 2013?  

Guests:

Today on Your Call: Friday Media Roundtable

Oct 19, 2012
Reuters

On today's Next Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll have a conversation about media coverage of issues raised during the second presidential debate including energy policies and Libya. What’s your assessment of the media coverage and what issues have yet to be discussed? We’ll be joined by Harper’s Scott Horton, Mother Jones’ Kate Shepard and the Guardian’s Jonathan Steele. Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. Where did you see the best reporting this week? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Annie Leonard, creator of The Story of Stuff and Jonah Sachs, author of Winning the Story Wars, about how environmental messages are created and which ones really make a difference.  We'll also speak with Ed Maibach, director of the Center for Climate Change Communication.  What kinds of stories motivate you, change your mind, inspire you, make you angry, and get you to act?  Join us at 10am PST or post a comment here.  Does climate change need a new messenger?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

(San Jose Mercury News) // There are still 1 million votes left to tally in the vote for Proposition 29, the San Jose Mercury News projects a loss for the proposed cigarette tax hike. A vast majority of the votes left uncounted come from districts in the southern part of the state, where there was less support for the initiative to raise the state tax on packs of cigarettes to $1...

One of the most imminent effects of climate change is sea level rise – especially in low-lying coastal areas like the San Francisco Bay. To documentarian Claire Schoen, this story isn’t about the science of what’s going to happen. That part is settled. She says the question is how we’re going to adapt.

KALW’s Ben Trefny sat down with Schoen to discuss her latest documentary about climate change, RISE.

BEN TREFNY: What inspired you to make this documentary?

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