college

What if you could take a year off between high school and college to figure out how the world works, and your place in it---before moving into that Freshman dorm? 

San Francsico Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Librarians furious as Berkeley tosses thousands of books // SF Gate

“Librarians, normally a sedate bunch, were more steamed than a romance novel in Berkeley on Wednesday over efforts to cull the city collection without consulting them first.

During a long, debilitating illness doctors failed to diagnose, author Gabrielle Glancy had enough energy to save Facebook screenshots, but not enough to write.  The award-winning poet and nationally known college admissions expert later wove them into a book about her ordeal. I'm Already Disturbed Please Come In: Parasites, Social Media & Other Planetary Disturbances (A Memoir, of Sorts) critiques  Western medicine and social media, and examines love in sickness and in health.  Gabrielle Glancy is Eric Jansen's guest on Out in the Bay, 7pm Thursday, July 2.* Hear her read from her book and talk about the issues it raises.

Expanding minds behind bars

May 4, 2015
Prison University Project Graduates of 2013
Nigel Poor

The Prison University Project is the only on-site degree college program in California's entire prison system. It's housed at San Quentin and the tuition-free program is so popular that prisoners across the state try to transfer to San Quentin to participate. San Quentin Prison Report's Tommy Shakur Ross tells the story of what happens when inmates go back to school.

Your Call: How are students paying for college?

Jul 31, 2014

On today's Your Call, we’ll rebroadcast a conversation about the underlying reasons for the rising cost of higher education. According to the College Board, over the past 30 years, average tuition at a four-year public college has risen by more than 250 percent, while family income has gone up only 16 percent. So how are families and students paying for college? What role should the federal government play to make college affordable? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.  

Guests:

On today’s Your Call, we’ll discuss how colleges are hiring part-time teachers to save costs, and what impact it has on education. Adjunct teachers now make up 50 percent of higher education faculty. Many receive no benefits and are paid poorly, with no chance of job-security or tenure. What happens to students when their teachers are contractors, not full-time professionals? And how are adjuncts organizing for change? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Holly Kernan and you.

 

  

Commentaries: San Francisco high schoolers on the influence of music

Jun 13, 2013

 

 

For some, music is a source of inspiration, and even guidance. For others, it may be the beginning of a potential career path.

In these next two commentaries, high school students from the Ruth Asawa School of the Arts in San Francisco explore the significance of music in their lives.

Hear Here: Seeking a higher education

May 15, 2013

Esther Goolsby is from East Oakland, and she is one of the people Carl Rist’s program might have helped if it were around back in the 90s. She was living in East Oakland, and at age 16 was already a mom. She told our community storytelling project, Hear Here, about the path she took to a college degree. 

Forget Med School, Become A Plumber Says Thiel

May 29, 2012
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nazareth_college/3524879265/

Peter Thiel, prominent venture capitalist and founder of PayPal, recently claimed on 60 Minutes that plumbers make more money than doctors. So why bother with higher education? It’s expensive, and you can get an equally well-paying job without it, goes the rationale.

The Minerva Project: an elite online university

Apr 11, 2012
Image courtesy of www.minervaproject.com

Ben Nelson, the founder of the online photo finishing company Snapfish, just received $25 million from Benchmark Capital in Silicon Valley, to launch what he claims is the answer to the  “lockjaw” problem at elite universities. In other words, top tier schools are overcrowded and unable to expand their undergraduate capacity, resulting in droves of qualified applicants turning to less prestigious institutions. His idea is called the Minerva Project, an online elite university.

 

rdln.wordpress.com

On the next Your Call, we’ll talk about how global events are inspiring political action.  On March 1st, protesters in support of Occupy Education California will begin a “99 Mile March for Education and Social Justice” to the capitol building in Sacramento.  What historical or recent event encouraged you to get politically involved?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. Is there a moment that caused you to get involved?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you. 

Guests: