community

Emily Corwin

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Kyung Jin Lee

Sixty-eight-year-old Oscar James stands on a hill overlooking the old Hunters Point Shipyard. He points out a street that’s now closed off by a chain-link fence. That’s where his family lived on a street once called Navy Road. There’s a striking view of the bay side of the peninsula.

“All that dirt, see it behind the lab, the road?” he asks. “From that road all the way back used to be water.”

  

Who are police today? On the January 21st edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race and justice with a conversation about police departments across the country. The total number of minority police officers has risen, but they’re concentrated in larger cities. The percentage of white cops is more than 30 points higher than in the communities they serve, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. What does the police force look like in your area? It's Your Call, with me, Rose Aguilar, and you.

Coming to America

Sep 15, 2014
Under CC license from Flickr user Ross Pollack

KALW has partnered with radio producers inside California's oldest prison to bring you the San Quentin Prison Report, a series of stories focusing on the experiences of these men, written and produced by those living inside the prison's walls.

 

When it comes to sending a message to the community, one way to do it is to simply stand together. That’s what one Oakland organization is doing by organizing a walk every Friday evening in some of the city’s most crime-heavy areas. Since 2012, Oakland has averaged around 860 aggravated assaults each year, with many of the incidents concentrated in East Oakland. Although these walks are organized by churches, they’ve attracted hundreds of secular participants.

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