community garden

Your Call: How are urban farms changing cities?

Jun 17, 2015

  

On the June 17th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about urban agriculture. Eighty percent of the US population lives in cities, further from farms than ever, but more and more city dwellers are growing their own food on empty lots or in their backyards. The film Growing Cities examines this trend from the Bay Area to Detroit.  How are urban farms revitalizing communities and changing the way we eat? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Daily news roundup for Monday, April 13, 2015

Apr 13, 2015
Aric Crabb / Bay Area News Group

Drought encourages do-it-yourself water recycling // Mercury News

"PLEASANTON -- Leon Jung figured he had to do something out of the ordinary to save his brown front lawn in a second year of water rationing. So he turned to his local sewage plant. He started trucking in reclaimed water a month ago from the plant that is the first in California to dispense free recycled effluent, or treated sewage, to do-it-yourselfers.


San Franciscans love to garden, but a backyard is hard to come by if you live in an apartment. And the 36 city-operated community gardens have wait lists with hundreds of names on them.

That’s why the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department had to get creative on the Golden Gate Park Community Garden. 

Kevin B. Jones

Watch:

Like many people who see a pretty rose in bloom, Annette Smith likes to take in the sight and scent of it. But when she bends her head to inhale this particular rose’s fragrance, her enjoyment comes with a deeper meaning – she remembers where this rosebush came from, and how and when it was planted here.

Audrey DIlling

Third-grader Kiana Sezawar is learning to care for plants at the Visitacion Valley Greenway community garden.