Cops & Courts

Criminal justice news

Jessica Christian/San Francisco Examiner

On the May 4th edition of Your Call we’ll discuss the Frisco Five hunger strike. 

San Quentin Prison Report: Learning to code

Apr 20, 2016
Courtesy The Last Mile

What do San Quentin and Silicon Valley have in common? Geographically they’re pretty close. But otherwise…they can seem pretty far apart.

Kevin Jones

This isn’t the story of another police shooting. It’s the story of what happens after a police shooting. Especially one in particular.

"2569" by flikr user Jeremy Brooks used under CC license. Resized and cropped.

 

There’s been a 45 percent increase in mental health-related calls to BART police since 2011. When officers don’t know what to do, they call Armando Sandoval.

San Quentin Prison Report: A nephew's forgiveness

Mar 16, 2016
Post News Group

In this segment from the San Quentin Prison Report, Reporter Tommy Shakur-Ross brings us the story of two inmates discovering they are linked by a murder — and how they manage forgiveness.

RENATO MILLER

On the March 10th edition of Your Call, we’ll revisit our conversation with Journalist Ioan Grillo about his new book, “Gangster Warlords: Drug Dollars, Killing Fields, and the New Politics of Latin America.” 

Wikimedia user Zboralski. Used under CC BY. Resized and Cropped

Mandi Hauwert is a correctional officer at San Quentin State Prison.  She's not the average correctional officer.  Hauwert is transgender.  She started working as a male officer inside the walls of San Quentin seven years ago.  Making such a transition is not easy even out in society. She tells us what it's like to transition while working inside a men's prison.

The shooting of Mario Woods in the Bayview by police officers in December embroiled San Franciscans in the conversation about police confrontations with people of color that has been carried out in cities across the nation over the last year.  

Elisabeth Fall/fallfoto.com

Monday, January 4th at 5pm, tune in to hear “Stories from San Quentin,” a special broadcast from Life of the Law featuring powerful human stories of prisoners, staff and volunteers at California's oldest prison.

HOLLY J. MCDEDE

 

Street protests and town hall meetings swiftly followed the shooting death  by police last week of 26-year-old Mario Woods in San Francisco’s Bayview district.

Image by Flickr user Daniel Arauz, with Creative Commons license. This photo was resized and cropped.

 

EDITOR'S NOTE: A previous version of this article contained errors that have been corrected, below:

* We stated that Brian Hofer had been working for a decade to scale back Oakland's Domain Awareness Center (DAC). The public became aware of the DAC in 2013, and Hofer began his work on the DAC in January of 2014.

Monday, October 19:  As part of City Vision's election coverage, guest host Eric Jansen sat down with the incumbent, Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi and his challengers, former interim Sheriff Vicki Hennessy and former Sheriff's Lieutenant John Robinson, to discuss the issues at stake in the election for Sheriff of the City and County of San Francisco.

San Quentin Prison Report: Surviving prison

Oct 5, 2015
flickr user: ah zut. https://flic.kr/p/aRvA3K

The first day of school or work can be nerve racking for anyone. Being a new kid on the block takes some getting used to. Now imagine a person's first day at a maximum-security prison.  How do you wrap your mind around coming from the everyday world to the violent and chaotic environment of prison life? Reporter Greg Eskridge introduces you to men who take us on their journey of survival through their first day of incarceration.

 

San Quentin Prison Report: Surviving prison

Oct 5, 2015
flickr user: ah zut. https://flic.kr/p/aRvA3K

Imagine a person's first day at a maximum-security prison. How do you wrap your mind around coming from the everyday world to the violent and chaotic environment of prison life? Reporter Greg Eskridge introduces us to men who will take us on their journey of survival through their first day of incarceration.

Join Rose Aguilar at The Roxie Theatre in San Francisco on Wednesday, October 7th at 7pm for a special screening of the award-winning documentary  3 1/2 Minutes, Ten Bullets, featuring a Q&A with Jordan Davis's father Ron Davis and Oscar Grant's mother Wanda JohnsonTickets now available at The Roxie's website.

On the September 10th edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about the new documentary 3 ½ Minutes, Ten Bullets. The film tells the story of Jordan Davis, an unarmed black 17 year-old shot to death after a dispute with a white man in a gas station parking lot on November 23, 2012.  

On the August 21st edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll continue our week-long series on the US prison system by discussing media coverage of the issues we focused on this week: how we got here, reform, solitary confinement, and youth.

Ben Oberg / Flickr

  

On the August 20th edition of Your Call, we continue our week-long series on the US prison system by discussing rehabilitation. 

Youth Radio

  

On the August 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our week-long series on the prison system by talking about juvenile incarceration.

On the August 17th edition of  Your Call, we’ll kick off a week long series about the prison industrial complex. From 1970 to 2010, the number of people in state and federal prisons went from 200,000 to more than 1.6 million.  Roughly one in every 107 American adults is behind bars. How did we become the world’s leading prison nation? Are we at a turning point for prison policy in the United States? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

When parents are in prison, kids pay the price

Aug 11, 2015
Catherine Girardeau

When someone is imprisoned, it doesn’t just affect the incarcerated. It affects the people left behind. Young people. Nearly three million children in the united states have parents in the criminal justice system – it’s almost 1 in 10 kids in California alone. It can be costly and difficult to visit or call a parent behind bars. And losing a relationship can be traumatic... with lasting consequences. A new art exhibit on Alcatraz Islan, called The Sentence Unseen, examines this reality. KALW’s Catherine Girardeau has the story.

On the July 24th edition of Your Call, it's our Friday media roundtable. This week, we'll discuss coverage of President Obama's visit to a federal prison facility and prison reform.

  

On the July 23rd edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the new feature film The Stanford Prison Experiment. 

What happens in the criminal justice system after a young black man is shot and killed?  On the next Your Call, we’ll talk about the new documentary 3 ½ Minutes, 10 Bullets, which tells the story of Jordan Davis, an unarmed black 17 year-old shot to death after a dispute with a white man in a gas station parking lot on November 23, 2012. 

Todd Whitney

When Chris Magnus took over the Richmond Police Department in 2006, he was tasked with cutting back violent crime in what was then known as one of America’s most dangerous cities.

San Quentin Prison Report: Lockdown

Jul 14, 2015

A lockdown happens when correctional officers decide there is a threat to the safety and security of a prison. That might be a fight, an assault, or a race riot. 

It is exactly what it sounds like. In a lockdown, inmates have to stay in their cells until the problem is contained. They can't go anywhere unless strip-searched, handcuffed, and escorted by correctional officers.

Jack Detsch / KALW

Three dollars and 25 cents won’t buy you a lot in today’s marketplace, but try to imagine what it might mean if you were a business owner in Oakland’s Chinatown, and you had to bump wages by that much for every hour worked.

San Quentin Prison Report: Back to prison

Jun 23, 2015
Nigel Poor

 

Local prison San Quentin combats recidivism with programs to help people adapt back into society. One of those projects is San Quentin Prison Report, a program training those who are incarcerated to produce stories from the inside.

After spending 25 years in prison for a first degree murder, Jessy Reed was finally preparing to be released. He vowed to never return to prison and looked forward to starting over with a new life on the outside. Once Reed was free, life on the outside became a series of challenges, piling up like one after the other.

 

I let so many people down who who who were looking up to me and just and just and just um expecting more of me you know I let down and hurt and and and that was devastating. --Jessy Reed

SQPR: When loyalty is misguided

Jun 3, 2015
Nigel Poor

Though being in a gang often means violence, it also offers a sense of belonging. Gang loyalty can end tragically when members end up betrayed by the very same people they sought to impress. This is the story of three men who misplaced their loyalty -- and in each case ended up with life sentences.

Click the audio player above to hear the entire story. 

  

On the May 27th edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about what we can learn from police forces in other countries. Last year, British police fired their weapons just three times. Most police officers in Britain, Ireland, Norway, Iceland and New Zealand don’t carry guns, even when they’re on patrol. President Obama recently banned the sale of military equipment to local law enforcement agencies. How will this affect how US police handle conflict? What other changes should be made? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you. 

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