Cops & Courts | KALW

Cops & Courts

Criminal justice news

Photo via Wikimedia Commons by user Ammodramus

  

How far have we come in reforming criminal justice, and what will it take to change the system? With 2.2 million people behind bars, the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world. Still, that number is at a two-decade low, according to a recent Bureau of Justice Statistics report.

Photo by Axel Dupeux / Open Society Foundations

  

On this edition of Your Call, we're talking about how families are affected when their loved ones go to prison. When Issac Bailey was just nine, he saw his oldest brother taken away in handcuffs. Moochie Bailey was imprisoned for murder for 32 years. Half of the ten boys in Bailey's family eneded up in the criminal justice system.

Hana Baba

For the first time in nearly a decade, Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O'Malley is running against an opponent.

Courtesy of Pamela Price

Pamela Price is an African American civil rights attorney who says she wants to create change in Alameda County's criminal justice systems.

What does society owe people who've been wrongly convicted?

May 31, 2018
Photo courtesy Northern California Innocence Project

  

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about what happens after someone is exonerated. What does society owe them?

Portrait: Matthew Septimus | Book art: Basic Books

  

The largest providers of psychiatric care in the US aren’t hospitals – they’re jails and prisons. On this edition of Your Call, we speak with journalist Alisa Roth about her new book Insane: America’s Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness.

 

  

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about why the increase of women in prisons has far surpassed the growth of male prisoners in the US.

 

Back in 2016, Santa Clara County Superior Court judge Aaron Persky sentenced Stanford swimmer Brock Turner to six months behind bars for raping an unconscious woman. The case sparked international outrage.  

Holly McDede

When Stanford student Brock Turner was sentenced to six months in prison for sexual assault back in 2016, lots of people thought he deserved a longer sentence. They saw a white, college athlete let off the hook.

 

San Quentin Radio: Losing your language in prison

May 16, 2018
MICHAEL LORUSSO / Flikr / Creative Commons

Imagine if you forgot how to speak the language you learned as a child — a language that gave you an identity, a language that says, "Hey you belong here, you're one of us." How will your sense of self be impacted?

The first weeks of freedom

May 16, 2018
Marissa Ortega-Welch

Anouthinh “Choy” Pangthong worked with KALW’s San Quentin Radio program for a couple years. Choy’s been in prison since he was 15. Then last month, after serving 22 years behind bars, he was released on parole.

Making art from San Quentin's Death Row

May 16, 2018
Photo Melissa Ysais (2018) / Courtesy of The William A. Noguera Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

 

About 750 incarcerated people have been sentenced to death in California. One of them is William Noguera. He’s a Colombian-American who grew up in a suburb of L.A, and he’s spent nearly 30 years on San Quentin’s Death Row after murdering his girlfriend’s mother when he was a teenager.

 

Proposition H is a San Francisco ballot measure that would speed up the process of arming the city’s police officers with stun guns.

San Francisco’s police officers are already on track to carry taser stun guns. Last November, the city’s police commission voted to arm police with tasers.

 

All over the world, Victory Outreach churches reach out to the downtrodden, including drug users, alcoholics and gang members.

Handout / Wikimedia Commons

California has seen some notorious serial killers over the years, including the Zodiac Killer, the Grim Sleeper, and the Hillside Strangler. But the Golden State Killer might be the most terrifying. 

kgroovy / Flikr Creative Commons

 

Kevin Cortopassi / Flikr Creative Commons

Since Sacramento police shot and killed Stephon Clark in his grandmother’s backyard last month, protests have taken to the streets almost everyday.

Jeff Foster

There’s Wifi and Tesla, Cheerios and Cocoa Puff. There are three registered Clintons, and thirteen Bernies. Those are just some of the names of registered dogs residing in San Francisco, where the city's 120,000 canines famously outnumber its children.

San Quentin Radio: Autism Behind Bars

Apr 3, 2018
Flickr user Michael LoRusso / Cropped and reused under CC license: https://bit.ly/2Ehdqjd

Autism is extremely hard to diagnose, because it can’t be tested for blood or genes. It’s a behavioral disorder. Often a parent or teacher has to notice the signs and request that a child is tested. Many people are living their lives without realizing they have autism. This includes people in prison.

Tony Webster

  

On this edition of Your Call, we discuss the killing of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man who was shot eight times by Sacramento police officers during a confrontation on March 18.

COURTESY OF JOSE ARTIGA

It's been over a year since President Donald Trump issued an executive order promising to halt federal funding for cities that limit cooperation with immigration agents. After the order was made, mayors from across the country vowed to remain so called “sanctuary cities” anyway. 

Photo by Rodney Dunning used under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

 

  

On this edition of Your Call, we’re discussing white supremacists and neo-nazis inside and outside of police forces. Recent reporting shows how police have ignored or even worked with white supremacists at political rallies.

Donna Personna

 

For decades, the story of the Compton's Cafeteria riot was lost to history. Few people knew about the courageous drag queen who fought back against police with a cup of hot coffee, or the transgender women who took to the streets that night. But now a theater piece is bringing that act of resistance back to life.

Margaret Shear / Flickr / Creative Commons

Everyone in San Francisco seems to have a story about a car break-in. It’s expensive, frustrating — and predictable.

flickr user Dank Depot via creative commons

  

On this edition of Your Call: Now that marijuana is legal in California, who will benefit? And how will racially biased drug laws change?

Daniel Schwen via Wikimedia Commons

When people who commit minor crimes can't pay their fines, they often end up in jail. It's just one aspect of systemic inequality in the criminal justice system. Peter Edelman explores this racially biased system in his new book Not a Crime to Be Poor: The Criminalization of Poverty in America.

He argues that the phrases 'school-to-prison pipeline' and 'cradle-to-prison pipeline' are too narrow. The United States has developed a criminal justice system that ensures a cradle to coffin pipeline. What's being done to change a system that traps entire communities in inescapable cycles of poverty? We'll speak with Edelman and Brendon Woods, the first African American public defender in Alameda County.

 

Amber Miller

 

California is becoming the largest legal marijuana market in the nation. It’s estimated that the industry will bring in more than $1 billion in taxes every year.

A San Francisco jury last week found Jose Ines Garcia Zarate not guilty of murder in the death of Kate Steinle.

  

Donald Trump has nominated more than five times as many judges to the federal courts as Barack Obama had at this point in his Presidency.

Incidents of police misconduct here in the Bay Area and nationwide have fueled widespread public concern. That’s what inspired filmmaker Pete Nicks to make his documentary movie “The Force,” which is out right now.

Pages