Cops & Courts

6:23pm

Wed April 2, 2014
Cops & Courts

Oakland's first gang-unit member recalls a dangerous Chinatown

Photo by Jean-Fabien. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jfl/4329536223/

In the 1980s, newspapers were regularly reporting on growing Asian gang problems in Oakland and in 1981 the Oakland police department created a special unit to address the issue.

Once the unit was formed the focus of the department was to develop trust between law enforcement and the Chinatown community. 

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11:43am

Fri March 14, 2014
Cops & Courts

Cannabis News Roundup: 03.14.14

Sativa leaf
transmitdistort.deviantart.com

2:50pm

Thu March 13, 2014
Cops & Courts

A day with the Eviction Assistance Unit

Deputies Joe Crittle and Diego Perez

When a landlord and a tenant are involved in a dispute, an eviction from the property is the last resort. And when evictions do occur in San Francisco, there are two people who are involved with every single one. They both make up the Eviction Assistance Unit at the Sheriff’s Department, but they don’t really act like cops. Their job is to visit anybody served an eviction notice and try to connect them to resources.

KALW’s Ninna Gaensler-Debs takes us through a day in their lives.

Click the player above to listen to the entire ridealong.

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5:30pm

Mon March 10, 2014
Cops & Courts

Interview: A second chance after life in prison

Author and criminal justice reporter Nancy Mullane

Since Jerry Brown became governor, a record number of inmates, including “lifers,” those sentenced to life behind bars, have been released from California prison. Lifers receive one of two kinds of life sentences: with or without the possibility of parole. Those sentenced with the possibility of parole are expected to use the decades spent in prison to reform themselves. They then have to go before a parole board to prove that they’re rehabilitated.

But since 1988, California’s governors have had the option to veto a parole board decision, and they’ve done so in the majority of cases, until recently.

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2:10pm

Mon March 10, 2014
Cops & Courts

Will prison arts programs make a comeback in California?

Eric Curtis reads his story aloud.
Kyung Jin Lee KALW

On a breezy summer day at San Quentin State Prison, inmate Paul Stauffer reads his writing to a live audience.

“My shoulders brush the sides of the wall and bunk as I pace the nine feet of my cell, between the sink and door. A scream echoed silently from my tortured soul, as hopeless dreams of a once meaningful life, floated endlessly across my mind…” he reads.

Creative self expression is a proven force for change in prisons. Inmates in this creative writing class, and classes like it, are less likely to commit crimes when they’re released.

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