Cops & Courts

8:30am

Wed February 1, 2012
Cops & Courts

A look inside California’s toughest prison

Photo by Rina Palta

If you’re convicted of committing a felony in California, you can end up in many kinds of prisons. Steal a lot of money in a Ponzi scheme – you might end up in minimum security. Locked up, but with little supervision. Commit a violent crime, and you could be sent to a medium-security prison, like Folsom. Kill someone, and you could be headed for supermax.

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4:09pm

Tue January 31, 2012
Cops & Courts

Imprisoned for Life: A three-part series

Under CC license from madamepsychosis. http://www.flickr.com/photos/belljar/6358519/

When you look at the numbers, many long held truths about crime crumble. Like this one: who do you think is more likely to become a life-long criminal: a rapist or a car thief?

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4:03pm

Thu January 12, 2012
Cops & Courts

How incarceration affects families: Interview with Lateefah Simon

Lateefah Simon is the director of the California Futures Initiative at the Rosenberg Foundation in San Francisco
Photo courtesy of Rosenberg Foundation

Nationally, women are the fastest growing prison population. And one of the highest female prison populations in the world is here in California. That's slated to change under the state's new realignment program. The number of women in prison is supposed to shrink drastically, by as much as half, over the next few years.

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3:27pm

Thu January 12, 2012
Cops & Courts

One year later, early release program brings parent inmates home

A mother and daughter reconnect during the Get on The Bus Event
Photo Courtesy of http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Parole/ACP.html

Last January, an alternative custody program was made law in California. So far 10 women have been released early and by the end of the next year, the California Department of Corrections expects 500 women to be back in their communities. The goal? To thin out the state’s overcrowded prisons and to help reunite families. KALW’s Nicole Jones reports on how this early release program is rolling out one year later.

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12:05pm

Thu January 12, 2012
Cops & Courts

Domestic violence and wrongful convictions: Turning a movie into a movement

Deborah Peagler is the subject of the documentary “Crime After Crime”

California is home to the largest U.S. women’s prison, located in Chowchilla. Women represent the fastest growing sector of the prison population nationwide and in the state. And the Habeas Project says about two-thirds of women behind bars report they are survivors of domestic abuse. One of those women was Deborah Peagler.

Peagler says her boyfriend started abusing her shortly after they began dating at age 15. She says he was upset with her because she refused to prostitute herself.

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