criminal justice

6:08pm

Thu June 5, 2014
Cops & Courts

Alameda County grapples with implementing Laura’s Law

If implemented, Laura’s Law would allow courts to compel those suffering from severe mental illness to outpatient treatment.
Flickr user andersdenkend

The shooting at Seattle Pacific University marks the latest gun-related tragedy in the U.S. It follows the attacks in Isla Vista at UC Santa Barbara. The country is talking about whether or not to require treatment for the severely mentally ill. In California, this has been an ongoing conversation, ever since the creation of Laura’s Law.

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5:39pm

Thu June 5, 2014
Health, Science, Environment

Behavioral Health Court offers offenders more than jail time

Behavioral health courts can give offenders who are mentally ill the option to be tried for non-felony crimes. Within the program, offenders can have access to not only the district attorney and public defender, but to several social services programs in order to help them get them back on their feet. 

One catch — they have to want to be in the program. 

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9:54am

Tue January 28, 2014
Arts & Culture

The Spot 1.30.14 School Discipline & Pete Seeger

Kyle Thompson

Life of the Law:  "School DisciplineAs the number of law enforcement officers on school campuses has gone up, so have the number of arrests. This month the Obama Administration issued recommendations for alternative forms of discipline -- but as the story of Kyle Thompson demonstrates, in the real world of schools, the issues are tricky.

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3:16pm

Thu August 8, 2013
Politics

Youth Radio: Why my neighborhood kids don't trust the system

Rachael Voorhees BY-NC-SA

I grew up in a middle-class, suburban county in New Jersey, but now I'm a twenty-something intern living in a low-income part of Washington, D.C. The realtor euphemism for such neighborhoods is “transitional,” a word that implies ongoing change. This is ironic because I feel that so many of the residents here feel as though things will never change, and will always stay the same. Since moving here, I've already become accustomed to the wail of sirens, the disconcerting, yet reassuring pulse of blue and red light through the heavy bars on my windows.

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5:35pm

Wed July 24, 2013
Cops & Courts

Policing theory suggests fixing broken windows helps fix crime

When we think of policing, we don’t always think about psychology. One is academic; the other, relentlessly real-world. But many police departments, including San Francisco’s, assign patrols based on a psychological theory: The Broken Windows Theory.

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