Crosscurrents

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Sep 1, 2015
Sausalito Marin City School District

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news

California lawmakers propose sweeping ivory ban to curb elephant poaching // Contra  Costa Times

SAN FRANCISCO -- "Two years after imposing a controversial ban on the sale of shark fins, California lawmakers are shifting their activism from the ocean to the jungle with a new effort to slow the alarming killing of African elephants by shutting down the market for ivory.

The music you’re hearing now is by The Tommy Igoe Groove Conspiracy.  Igoe describes the group as “a rock band in a jazz band’s body.”

You’ll find all 15 members of The Groove Conspiracy at Yoshi's in Oakland on Friday, August 27. Doors open at 7:30 pm.

The music you’re hearing now is by Karina Denike. She was born in England, but has lived most of her life in Oakland. You might know her from the duo, Dance Hall Crashers.

For the San Francisco Mime Troupe, the show goes on

Aug 6, 2015
Lezak Shallat

San Francisco Mime Troupe has a history of being one of the city's most vocal social critics. This August 7th marks the 50th anniversary of the day they almost fell silent.

This music? It’s by Dakila,  a Latin rock band with roots tracing back to the 1970s.  Dakila is one of several bands taking part in this weekend’s Nihommachi Street Fair in San Francisco’s Japantown. They’ll be playing on Saturday. Check the Nihonmachi Street Fair website for specifics.

Parg / Flickr

The KALW News team is looking for an experienced and creative sound engineer/sound designer to help mix our daily news magazine Crosscurrents.

flickr user David Shankbone: http://bit.ly/1K6yKq2

San Francisco musician Scot Sier believes that protest music is a powerful source of inspiration for movements like Occupy And Black Lives Matter. And he's compiled more than 700 new songs  - from hip hop to R&B, and reggae to dub step – to share.

Poster designed by R Black

This is Audiograph--the Bay Area’s sonic signature.

Each week, we’ll play you a sound recorded somewhere in the Bay Area. Your job? Listen to the sound (in the player above), figure out where it was recorded, and what exactly it is, then call us to let us know.

If you think you can identify this Audiograph sound of the week, call 415-264-7106. Also, tell us where to record next. We’ll give away a KALW t-shirt every week to one lucky caller.

San Francisco is considered a national leader in pro-environmental policy, advocacy, and education. And while the City is a pioneer in recycling it may be getting tougher on street recyclers who scavenge from blue bins throughout the city.

Street recycling is a growing underground economy. And it is illegal. In 2012, Supervisor Christina Olague requested a hearing looking into how much money the City was losing because of scavengers, as well as ways to prevent the practice. Ben Trefny had the story.

This story by originally aired on March 29, 2012.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Jun 16, 2015
S.F. Examiner / Mike Koozmin

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Plan to increase S.F. police staffing advances through committee  // SF Gate 

"A plan to increase San Francisco’s Police force is one step closer to being realized after passing a Board of Supervisors committee on Monday.  

Liz Mak

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Poster designed by R Black

This is Audiograph--the Bay Area’s sonic signature. 

Each week, we’ll play you a sound recorded somewhere in the Bay Area. Your job? Listen to the sound (in the player above), figure out where it was recorded, and what exactly it is, then call us to let us know.

If you think you can identify this Audiograph sound of the week, call 415-264-7106. Also, tell us where to record next. We’ll give away a KALW t-shirt every week to one lucky caller. 

The KALW public radio news department is hiring a part-time digital strategist. This is a position for an independent contractor.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, May 6, 2015

May 6, 2015

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

California drought: State water board passes first mandatory urban water limits in state history // San Jose Mercury News

Bringing California's historic drought directly to every home and business in the state, the administration of Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday imposed the first mandatory urban water conservation rules in state history.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

Apr 22, 2015
SF Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW news.

Judge rules that blind passengers can sue Uber for discrimination // SFGate

A federal magistrate will allow a lawsuit to move forward on behalf of blind Californians accusing the ride-hailing company Uber of discriminating against passengers with guide dogs. One advocate says the ruling sets a precedent for holding technology companies accountable under civil rights laws.

Flikr user Jeff Croft

The number of children in the city of San Francisco is dwindling. Back in the 1960s, kids made up a full quarter of the population. The latest census numbers showed the city was made up by only 13.4 percent of them. But now, after a concerted effort by City Hall, there’s been a dramatic change.

A note for our readers: the following story is of an adult nature.

Dr. Robert Okin served as chief of Psychiatry at San Francisco General hospital for 17 years. During that time, he cared for many of the people you see on the city’s streets when they end up in the hospital. Okin says many homeless people suffer from mental illness and as we walk by them on the street, we too often fail to remember that they are just like you and me. So, Dr. Okin spent two years photographing and talking to San Francisco’s homeless population, collecting their profiles in a photo essay book called Silent Voices: People with Mental Disorders on the Street.

LOCAL MUSIC: Be Calm Honcho

Dec 2, 2014

This band is called Be Calm Honcho. The members come from widely varied geographic locations, but they now call San Francisco home.  You can tell they’re still new here, though, because they refer to it as “San Fran.” Be Calm Honcho is one of three bands playing at Doc’s Lab in North Beach tomorrow (12.03). Doors open at 10:30 pm.  

 

We're having some of our warmest weather of the year, so how about some Ice Cream?  Not the dairy treat, the band you're hearing now.

Ice Cream plays Thursday night at Milk Bar on Haight Street in San Francisco. They don't give much information on their website, so if you go, let us know how you liked the show!

"OneWorldTradeCenter" by Joe Mabel - Flickr. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

The new building at One World Trade Center, better known as the "Freedom Tower," opened today in New York City. We thought that we would share some of our own recollections of September 11th, 2001 with you. By clicking on their names below, you can hear some memories from members of the KALW news crew.

 

Daniel Alarcón is a novelist who lives in San Francisco. But there’s more to him than that. His identity reaches across many borders. And his storytelling traverses multiple media.

His latest book, At Night We Walk in Circles, was a finalist for this year's PEN/Faulkner award. His feature story "The Contestant" was part of the first edition of the California Sunday Magazine. And you may have heard his show Radio Ambulante – a Spanish-language podcast that airs Thursday nights on KALW that is often compared with This American Life.

This Sunday, Alarcón is expanding his broad horizons even further, hosting a live Radio Ambulante event in San Francisco at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. The show is called Outsiders and will feature multimedia storytelling from Cuba, Chile, Mexico, and the United States.

Jazz Perspective: Carmen Lundy

Oct 6, 2014
Flickr User Zuleykha Murtazayeva

Carmen Lundy is a triple threat: she sings, she plays multiple instruments, and she is a composer. She has just released her 14th album, "Soul to Soul," a collection of songs that draw on blues and gospel influences. Producer Reese Erlich brings us this “Jazz Perspective” about Lundy’s unique song-writing style.

Credit: Oakland Wiki

On November 4th, Oakland voters will pick their next mayor. All month on “Crosscurrents,” we are going to bring you the voices of each of the 15 people who are campaigning for the job.  

Jeannie. Doan

When I’m bored, I just start doodling on anything I can get my hands on. The things that I draw are pretty random. I let my mind go, and it just spills my imagination on paper. Sometimes the characters I draw are original. Other times they’re characters from my favorite anime, a Japanese term for cartoons.

On the latest Manager's Report to the Listeners, KALW General Manager Matt Martin talks about some big news at KALW:  After 14 years at the station, News Director Holly Kernan is going to be leaving KALW.  Matt shares his thoughts about Holly's departure, and his appreciation for the visionary work she has done creating and growing Crosscurrents and KALW News.  He also responds to listener e-mails about coverage of Gaza, the station's new fundraising partnership with My Broker Donates, and the pilots of the new music show Liner Notes.

Melanie Young

With the start of a new school year, families all around San Francisco are sending their children off with hopes for a good year and a bright future. But according to Carolina Guzman with the nonprofit Mission Economic Development Agency, or MEDA, children in the Mission District struggle on every rung of the education ladder. She says half the children entering kindergarten aren’t prepared to learn.

Judy Silber

If you remember the early 1970s, you remember the long gas lines during the Middle East oil embargo. The crisis was a sharp reminder of U.S. dependency on foreign oil. Soon after, the government began investing in alternative energy.

California entrepreneurs saw potential in the gusty winds that blew out at the Altamont Pass, between the Central Valley and Bay Area. By the mid-’80s, the Altamont was the country’s biggest wind farm. To many, the turbines were more than a new technology. They were symbols of hope, a sign of progress and a world that no longer relied on fossil fuels.

Elizabeth Young

So what? I’m a little obsessed with pigeons. I’m not sure when it started exactly, but at some point I realized I couldn’t keep my eyes off of them.

I take photos of them whenever I get the chance: making patterns in the sky as they play in the wind; huddling on telephone lines; bathing in the dirty water that pools on the side of the road. I think it’s fascinating to see how they survive alongside us, in all of our filthy urban glory.

Under CC license from Flickr user Scott Beale.

The Bay Area is constantly evolving. We've gone from the Gold Rush to Silicon Valley; shifted from boom to bust, and back again. It can feel a little bit like déjà vu. Back in 2000, just before the dot-com bubble burst, unemployment in San Francisco was at an all-time low of 3 percent. It’s nearing that again – approaching what economists call "full employment," meaning, statistically anyway, there are jobs for everyone who wants one.

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