dance

"Baloney" Gay Revue Teases, Titillates, Provokes

Jul 9, 2015
Gareth Gooch

Its creators call Baloney “San Francisco’s First Gay All-Male Revue,” but this weekend in SF, women join the cast.  Choreographer Rory Davis and writer and director Michael Phillis play clips and tell the tale of this sexy, humorous, thought-provoking show on this week's Out in the Bay (7pm PDT Thursday). Baloney plays this Thursday - Saturday at Oasis in San Francisco. You'll also hear a clip from Phillis’ short film “Mini Supreme” about a 32-year-old man who enters a beauty pageant for little girls, and about the glue that holds these artists together and how they keep their creative dreams alive in the challenging city San Francisco has become.

TaSin Sabir

Bayview has long been known as San Francisco’s industrial hub. But on Yosemite Street there’s an imposing brick building with a dance studio. Inside the space there's a group of young people who climb on pieces of welded iron that hang three feet off the ground. They run and mess around with each other during breaks. But their joviality turns to concentration when they get in the air. Up there they’re spinning, floating, and thriving.

 

It’s early evening, and Anna Halprin is leading one of her weekly dance and improvisation classes at her Marin County studio. She guides the dancers across the wood floor, gracefully demonstrating movement after movement. Her voice fills the room as she encourages students to dig deeper.

Courtesy of Grant Avenue Follies

From the 1940s until the 1960s, San Francisco’s Chinatown was home to a thriving Chinese American nightclub scene. The clubs had names like Forbidden City, the Chinese Skyroom, and the Shanghai Low. They had showgirls, ballroom duos, comedians, jazz singers, and magic acts -- all featuring Asian-American entertainers. These clubs had wide appeal: celebrities like Bing Crosby, Duke Ellington, and Lauren Bacall were all spotted over the years, along with tourists, businessmen and locals.

Rocked By Women rocks Oakland May 9 & 10

May 7, 2015

  

Rocked by Women is a multimedia dance theatre performance in Oakland this weekend that celebrates women’s music and its influence over nearly half a century -- music by the likes of Cris Williamson, Holly Near and Ani DiFranco that helped Rocked by Women creator and choreographer Sarah Bush and many other lesbians come out. Eric Jansen speaks with her and director Becca Wolff, and they play music from the production. 7pm Thursday on Out in the Bay.

StoryCorps: Two artists fall in love

Apr 2, 2015

Jena McRae, a dancer with the Embodiment Project, first met David "Dublin" Schwirtz, a vocalist with the Shotgun Wedding Quintet, during a rehearsal at the Treat Street Social Club. They sat down with StoryCorps and shared a few highlights of how their relationship evolved over time, into love.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Mar 17, 2015
Tim Hussin, Special To The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW news.

Dancers state out turf on BART // SF Gate

"A recent Friday, 1:37 p.m.: Calling themselves the Turf Feinz, the four members of the Turf dance crew dart through a BART train headed for San Francisco. They need to find the next audience to wow before the doors open at Embarcadero Station.

Tom Levy

Some people who take dance classes regularly have a saying: “Dance is my church.”

Dancer Stella Adelman says just that about going to Afro-Cuban folkloric dance class. “There’s a release to it,” she says. To her, it’s a place where she can reflect and find some clarity through movement. To some practitioners this clarity comes from being active and getting exercise, for others, it’s literally a spiritual practice.  

The Bay Area is home to many instructors of Afro-Cuban rhythms. Music and dance lovers come from all over the world to participate in workshops taught by some of the most loved teachers and dancers from the Cuban Diaspora. Many of them have found home here.

Preparing for the SF International Hip Hop DanceFest

Nov 13, 2014
Allan Frias

 

It’s 10 p.m. on a Monday night and I am at a dance studio in San Francisco's Mission District. About 25 members of the dance company Mind Over Matter, mostly women, are finishing their warm up. Dressed in comfy street clothes, they stretch while they chat. They are rehearsing for the San Francisco International Hip Hop DanceFest, which kicks off this weekend.

Andy Mogg

San Francisco is a city known for a lot of things: cable cars, political activism, a vibrant arts scene. One annual event has been bringing these things together for 11 years now.

Every October, the free outdoor dance festival known as San Francisco Trolley Dances takes audiences on guided tours on public transit with live performance. It’s two days long, with six tours a day. On each tour, audiences ride the streetcars with a guide who brings them to various locations near MUNI stops.

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