Daphne Matziaraki

5:31pm

Thu June 12, 2014
Politics

The San Francisco Shipyard: Undoing the toxic legacy

Luiza Leite

Marie Harrison is very familiar with the health issues in Bayview Hunters Point.

"I've lived and raised children in Bayview for almost 50 something years, and honestly for as long as I can remember there have always been complaints. Because no one really understood the relationship between their illnesses and where they lived," Harrison says.

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7:00pm

Wed June 11, 2014
Politics

The San Francisco Shipyard: Who gets the jobs?

Freddy Carter is working on block 51. This is one of the first buildings in the reinvention of the historic Hunters Point Shipyard that will come on the market.

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6:17pm

Tue June 10, 2014
Politics

The San Francisco Shipyard: Who will live in San Francisco’s new town

Hunters Point Building
Under CC license from Flickr user Chris D 2006

Linda Richardson is sitting in her car just outside a huge, fenced off, construction zone. This is where Lennar Urban is slowly building a new development at the site of the abandoned Navy shipyard. 12,000 homes by 2021. Richardson, a long time resident and community activist, wants to show me who will be most affected by the redevelopment.

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10:41am

Fri June 6, 2014
Economy/Labor/Biz

San Francisco's Hunters Point: An in-depth series from KALW News

Hunters Point, San Francisco

San Francisco's Hunters Point Shipyard has played many roles. In the 1940s, it became a magnet for African Americans migrating from the South seeking jobs in the Navy's shipbuilding and maintenance industry. In the 1970s, when the military started to leave, it became an empty shell – a massive, polluted space eventually designated a Superfund site. Now, it's being redeveloped with the promise of new housing, jobs and open space. But in today's San Francisco, who is it for?

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5:25pm

Thu December 12, 2013
Economy/Labor/Biz

Behind the scenes on a pot farm in Mendocino

Federally, marijuana production is still a major crime, one that can land you in prison for decades. Yet, in northern California, there’s a whole economy built around it. They call the area the Emerald Triangle – made by Humboldt, Trinity and Mendocino counties. In Mendocino specifically, the gradual decline of the lumber industry led to marijuana becoming one of the county’s major commercial crops over the last decade.

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