Dia de los Muertos

What do Halloween, Day of the Dead and All Saints Day have in common? They each transform the taboo around talking about death. 

Bryan Keith Thomas

On the December 31st edition of  Your Call, we’ll revisit our  conversation with artists about the 21st annual Oakland Museum’s Day of the Dead exhibition, Rituals + Remembrance.

If you’re looking for suggestions of interesting things to do around the Bay Area this weekend, search no further, we’ve collected a few recommendations just for our KALW audience.

In our preparations for this weekend’s spooky celebrations, we’ve chosen a few top shelf activities and events to do around our Bay Area.



Leila Day

If you walk down Mission Street this weekend you’ll see family members holding pictures of loved ones in one hand and candles in another. You may see ofrendas--small altars set up to pay tribute to people who have passed away. It’s a tradition that’s been present in the Mission for years, but how it’s celebrated depends on who you ask.

There are ghosts and skeletons everywhere you look on Halloween. But for many cultures the more serious commemoration of the dead takes place the next day, November 1. It’s known as el Dia de los Muertos in Latin cultures – the Day of the Dead – when parades, elaborate skeleton costumes, and temporary altars are built to honor ancestors and those who have recently passed.