Matthew Keys / flickr


On the September 23rd edition of Your Call, we're talking about the increasing number of wildfires blazing across California. 

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, Semptember 3, 2015

Sep 3, 2015
Tony Avelar / The Christian Science Monitor / Getty Images

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

California's Katrina is coming // Wired


"California's always been for dreamers. Dreams of gold brought the forty-niners. Easy seasons and expansive arable acreage brought farmers, dreaming of an agricultural paradise. Fame, natural beauty, and the hang-loose cultural mosaic have brought dreaming millions to the state where summer never seems to end.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Aug 19, 2015
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news.

Appeal to stop ‘excessive’ sand mining in SF Bay scheduled for next week // SF Examiner

“An environmental group will present arguments in an appeals court next week in what may be the group’s final legal effort to stop what it deems excessive sand mining in the San Francisco Bay.

David Briggs / Point Reyes Light

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California drought hasn't killed summer vacations // San Jose Mercury News

“Unexpected summer storms in the Sierra, highly orchestrated water diversions, and Californians' resourcefulness and sunny dispositions have kept the classic American vacation afloat -- just as summer winds down and the first school bells are about to ring.”



On the July 15th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our weeklong series on solutions to California’s drought by talking about recycling and reusing wastewater.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, May 19, 2015

May 19, 2015
Sam Wolson / Special To The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news

Smelly dead whales on Pacifica beach to get proper burial // SFGate

"A pair of dead whales, which have been decomposing on a Pacifica beach for weeks, will have to be buried due to “quality of life” issues for surrounding residents, officials said.

"In other words, giant, lifeless, rotting carcasses are not pleasant to live next to.

Witching to find water

May 12, 2015

The lack of rain has forced California farmers and wine makers to turn from the sky to the ground to find water. It’s down there, but you have to know exactly where it is in order to drill a well.  

There are a couple of options for how to do this: you can have a geologist use mapping and scientific data to get a lay of the land; or you can can hire a water witch. These are people who search for water using two thin sticks or iron rods that they say cross each other when there’s water  under the earth.

Reuters / Nacho Doce

One the May 8th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss media coverage of California’s drought.


When California’s new groundwater law was written, who had a seat at the table and who was left out?


On the May 6th edition of Your Call, we continue our weeklong series on California’s water crisis by talking about the $110 billion bottled water industry.

Dry farming: a technique for a water scarce future

Apr 27, 2015
Photo by Gregory Urquiaga/UC Davis, 2014


Earlier this month, Governor Jerry Brown stepped up to a podium in a dry, grassy field in Eastern California. He took a deep breath, and made a landmark statement.

"We’re in a historic drought, and that demands unprecedented action. It’s for that reason that I’m issuing an executive order demanding substantial water reduction across our state."

Daily news roundup for Monday, April 13, 2015

Apr 13, 2015
Aric Crabb / Bay Area News Group

Drought encourages do-it-yourself water recycling // Mercury News

"PLEASANTON -- Leon Jung figured he had to do something out of the ordinary to save his brown front lawn in a second year of water rationing. So he turned to his local sewage plant. He started trucking in reclaimed water a month ago from the plant that is the first in California to dispense free recycled effluent, or treated sewage, to do-it-yourselfers.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 9, 2015

Apr 9, 2015

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San Francisco man shares story of escaping war-torn Yemen // KTVU

Daily News Roundup for Monday April 6, 2015

Apr 6, 2015

California drought: Woodside, Fremont on opposite ends of water-saving spectrum // Mercury News

"Faced with tough new state water restrictions, lush towns like Woodside are going to have to start behaving a lot more like golden-hued Fremont.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Apr 2, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

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California Drought: Governor Orders First-Ever Water Restrictions // SFist 

The LA Times recently published an editorial that reported that California’s reservoirs are currently storing only about a year’s worth of water supply. Significant storms could still add to that supply, but it’s daunting data, coming at the tail end of the traditional wet season.


Twice a week, the Heart of the City Farmers Market transforms San Francisco’s gritty United Nations Plaza with dozens of white canopies and truckloads of fresh produce. But on a recent sunny winter Wednesday, the abundance of sweet-smelling fruits and vegetables are contrasted by a gloomy point.

It didn’t rain once here last January. Not in this spot, nor in all of San Francisco.

Flickr user toyzrus8

The Hetch Hetchy Regional Water system, operated by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (PUC), carries water to 2.6 million customers in the Bay Area. How it does that is remarkable – remarkably simple, says PUC Water Resources Manager, David Briggs.

Your Call: What if we ate as if water mattered?

Mar 19, 2015

On the March 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our weeklong series on California’s water crisis by discussing the water footprint of food. Agriculture accounts for 80 percent of water use in the state. It takes 28 gallons of water to produce a 12-oz beer; 1,800 gallons to produce a pound of beef; and 1,900 gallons to produce a pound of almonds. Is there such a thing as a drought-friendly diet? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Dr. Gidon Eshel, research professor of environmental science and physics at Bard College

What do you want to know about California’s new groundwater law? On the next Your Call, we’ll continue our weeklong series on California’s water crisis by talking about the state’s first-ever rules for pumping groundwater in California. Nearly 40 percent of California’s water comes from underground sources. About 30 million Californians rely on groundwater for their drinking water. But areas are being pumped faster than they are being replenished. How is groundwater managed now? And what changes should we expect? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Daily news roundup for Monday, March 16, 2015

Mar 16, 2015

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Diablo Canyon nuclear plant safe in earthquakes, PG&E says in report // LA Times

"California’s last remaining nuclear power plant can safely withstand earthquakes, tsunamis and flooding, according to documents submitted by the owner of the Diablo Canyon plant to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Under CC license from Flickr user Janet Ciucci

California is entering its fourth year of drought – and it’s really starting to show in some of the state’s most vital water resources. The Central Valley Project, which supplies water for about a third of California’s farmland, recently announced it had no water to give. That means those farmers will have to seek water elsewhere or let fields go fallow. About six percent of available farmland went unplanted last year due to the drought, resulting in more than $1 billion in lost revenue. The dire situation has left farmers and regular folks alike wondering when’s it going to end.

KALW’s Audrey Dilling has been looking into how much water it would take to get us out of this drought. She joined KALW’s Hana Baba in studio to talk about what she learned.

Todd Whitney

Turning on your faucet may be easy, but the process of getting you that water is anything but. Water has a long journey to get to your tap, often starting in the mountains, traveling through aqueducts, and stopping over in reservoirs along the way. The reservoirs that hold our water can sometimes take on a life of their own, supporting whole ecosystems of animals and plants. 

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Feb 10, 2015
Dan Brekke / KQED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Locally and Nationally, renters pay dearly to cut commutes // SF GATE


To what extent is climate change causing or worsening California's drought, and how is the drought similar to other extreme weather events like superstorm Sandy? Columbia University climatologist Adam Sobel joins us to talk about the current drought, its causes, and how we can manage the increasing risk of future natural disasters.


Adam H. Sobel, Professor of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University. He is also the author of Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate, and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.

On the November 12th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’re discussing the current state of the drought. A dozen communities across the state are at risk of running out of water, and at least 700 households already lack access to running water. Farmers have left nearly a half-million acres of land unplanted. How will new groundwater regulations and Proposition 1 impact water usage? What do you want to know about the drought? Is it affecting your area? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.


On the September 29th edition Your Call, we’ll have a debate about Proposition 1, the ballot initiative that would authorize a 7-and-a-half billion dollar state bond for water infrastructure projects. Proponents say Proposition 1 will clean up groundwater, expand recycling and storage capacity. Opponents say it’s too vague and does nothing to address long-term water shortages in California. It’s six weeks from Election Day - what questions do you have about Proposition 1?   Join the conversation with David Onek and you.


Your Call: How should we cope with extreme drought?

Aug 7, 2014
(Holly Bailey/Yahoo News)




On the August 7th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation about the most severe drought in California's history. Nearly 60 percent of the state is in exceptional drought. Groundwater reserves are being depleted at record rates as wildfires break out north and south. What can the media and governments do to increase understanding of the severity of this drought? What is the state doing to conserve water, and how much is left? Join us on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Courtesty of the Pacific Institute

As California faces an extreme drought, water politics are under a microscope now more than ever. Oakland-based Pacific Institute is a leader in research on the impacts of climate change on water. Its director, Peter Gleick, was awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship for his work on water resources.

Even though 38 million Californians cook, clean and bathe with water, the Central Valley is still the largest user by far, taking up 75 percent of the state's water supply. Gleick sat down with KALW's Ben Trefny to decipher the state's water issues.