LAFD / Used Under CC / flickr

On the September 1st edition of Your Call, we’re talking about how climate change is affecting wildfires.

Photo courtesy of Marc Mondavi

Five years of drought has forced California farmers and wine makers to turn from the sky to the ground to find water. It’s down there, but you have to know exactly where it is in order to drill a well.  

Under creative commons license from Flickr user eugene_o // resized and cropped


The Sacramento San-Joaquin Delta is the state’s biggest water supply, providing water for 25 million people. It’s also the most contested. Northern and Southern Californians have been fighting over who’s entitled to that water for more than a century. Right now, the latest battle is playing out. The largest water supplier in the country—Metropolitan Water District—has made a bid to buy 20 thousand acres of land in the Delta.

Illustration by Kyle Trefny

The Bridge is a new podcast featuring the best stories to come out of the KALW newsroom. Each week we'll bring you sound-rich, deeply reported stories about the Bay Area. Subscribe to the show in iTunes or Stitcher, add our RSS feed, or just search for "Bridge KALW" in your favorite podcast app. Our first episode is all about the drought.

Your Call: Looming global water shortage

Jun 1, 2016
Judd McCullum / used under CC / flickr

 On the June 1st edition of Your Call, we'll discuss the global water crisis. 

Daily news roundup for Monday, March 14, 2016

Mar 14, 2016
"Mission San Juan Capistrano," by Flickr user David M. Used under CC BY-NC 2.0 / cropped and resized.

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

At Stanford, UC Berkeley, battles rage over controversial names on campus // Mercury News 

"College students inspired in part by the Black Lives Matter movement, are calling for the removal of symbols honoring people connected to slavery and colonialism."

Are we close to getting out of the drought?

Feb 2, 2016
Flickr user Daniel Hoherd under CC license. Resized/cropped.


Any day now, The California State Water Resources Control Board will vote on whether to extend Governor Jerry Brown’s mandatory restrictions on water use.

Felicia Marcus tells us how she manages multiple interests for one of the earth's most precious (and dwindling) resources.

Todd Whitney

Despite the recent rain and projections that El Niño is on its way, there’s little chance that the storms will end California’s drought. At least, Governor Brown’s not counting on it.

Saving water, one flush at a time

Nov 10, 2015
Catherine Girardeau

Nobody at my house is very handy, so when there are plumbing issues, we go for the workarounds: like plunging, and putting buckets under leaky faucets to catch the drips and using the buckets to flush the toilets. 

Ray Bouknight / flickr

  On the November 5th edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about how California is weathering the drought. 

Matthew Keys / flickr


On the September 23rd edition of Your Call, we're talking about the increasing number of wildfires blazing across California. 

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, Semptember 3, 2015

Sep 3, 2015
Tony Avelar / The Christian Science Monitor / Getty Images

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

California's Katrina is coming // Wired


"California's always been for dreamers. Dreams of gold brought the forty-niners. Easy seasons and expansive arable acreage brought farmers, dreaming of an agricultural paradise. Fame, natural beauty, and the hang-loose cultural mosaic have brought dreaming millions to the state where summer never seems to end.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Aug 19, 2015
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news.

Appeal to stop ‘excessive’ sand mining in SF Bay scheduled for next week // SF Examiner

“An environmental group will present arguments in an appeals court next week in what may be the group’s final legal effort to stop what it deems excessive sand mining in the San Francisco Bay.

David Briggs / Point Reyes Light

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California drought hasn't killed summer vacations // San Jose Mercury News

“Unexpected summer storms in the Sierra, highly orchestrated water diversions, and Californians' resourcefulness and sunny dispositions have kept the classic American vacation afloat -- just as summer winds down and the first school bells are about to ring.”



On the July 15th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our weeklong series on solutions to California’s drought by talking about recycling and reusing wastewater.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, May 19, 2015

May 19, 2015
Sam Wolson / Special To The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news

Smelly dead whales on Pacifica beach to get proper burial // SFGate

"A pair of dead whales, which have been decomposing on a Pacifica beach for weeks, will have to be buried due to “quality of life” issues for surrounding residents, officials said.

"In other words, giant, lifeless, rotting carcasses are not pleasant to live next to.

Reuters / Nacho Doce

One the May 8th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss media coverage of California’s drought.


When California’s new groundwater law was written, who had a seat at the table and who was left out?


On the May 6th edition of Your Call, we continue our weeklong series on California’s water crisis by talking about the $110 billion bottled water industry.

Dry farming: a technique for a water scarce future

Apr 27, 2015
Photo by Gregory Urquiaga/UC Davis, 2014


Earlier this month, Governor Jerry Brown stepped up to a podium in a dry, grassy field in Eastern California. He took a deep breath, and made a landmark statement.

"We’re in a historic drought, and that demands unprecedented action. It’s for that reason that I’m issuing an executive order demanding substantial water reduction across our state."

Daily news roundup for Monday, April 13, 2015

Apr 13, 2015
Aric Crabb / Bay Area News Group

Drought encourages do-it-yourself water recycling // Mercury News

"PLEASANTON -- Leon Jung figured he had to do something out of the ordinary to save his brown front lawn in a second year of water rationing. So he turned to his local sewage plant. He started trucking in reclaimed water a month ago from the plant that is the first in California to dispense free recycled effluent, or treated sewage, to do-it-yourselfers.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 9, 2015

Apr 9, 2015

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

San Francisco man shares story of escaping war-torn Yemen // KTVU

Daily News Roundup for Monday April 6, 2015

Apr 6, 2015

California drought: Woodside, Fremont on opposite ends of water-saving spectrum // Mercury News

"Faced with tough new state water restrictions, lush towns like Woodside are going to have to start behaving a lot more like golden-hued Fremont.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Apr 2, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California Drought: Governor Orders First-Ever Water Restrictions // SFist 

The LA Times recently published an editorial that reported that California’s reservoirs are currently storing only about a year’s worth of water supply. Significant storms could still add to that supply, but it’s daunting data, coming at the tail end of the traditional wet season.


Twice a week, the Heart of the City Farmers Market transforms San Francisco’s gritty United Nations Plaza with dozens of white canopies and truckloads of fresh produce. But on a recent sunny winter Wednesday, the abundance of sweet-smelling fruits and vegetables are contrasted by a gloomy point.

It didn’t rain once here last January. Not in this spot, nor in all of San Francisco.

Flickr user toyzrus8

The Hetch Hetchy Regional Water system, operated by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (PUC), carries water to 2.6 million customers in the Bay Area. How it does that is remarkable – remarkably simple, says PUC Water Resources Manager, David Briggs.

Your Call: What if we ate as if water mattered?

Mar 19, 2015

On the March 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our weeklong series on California’s water crisis by discussing the water footprint of food. Agriculture accounts for 80 percent of water use in the state. It takes 28 gallons of water to produce a 12-oz beer; 1,800 gallons to produce a pound of beef; and 1,900 gallons to produce a pound of almonds. Is there such a thing as a drought-friendly diet? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Dr. Gidon Eshel, research professor of environmental science and physics at Bard College