drought

Daily news roundup for Monday, March 16, 2015

Mar 16, 2015

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Diablo Canyon nuclear plant safe in earthquakes, PG&E says in report // LA Times

"California’s last remaining nuclear power plant can safely withstand earthquakes, tsunamis and flooding, according to documents submitted by the owner of the Diablo Canyon plant to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Under CC license from Flickr user Janet Ciucci

California is entering its fourth year of drought – and it’s really starting to show in some of the state’s most vital water resources. The Central Valley Project, which supplies water for about a third of California’s farmland, recently announced it had no water to give. That means those farmers will have to seek water elsewhere or let fields go fallow. About six percent of available farmland went unplanted last year due to the drought, resulting in more than $1 billion in lost revenue. The dire situation has left farmers and regular folks alike wondering when’s it going to end.

KALW’s Audrey Dilling has been looking into how much water it would take to get us out of this drought. She joined KALW’s Hana Baba in studio to talk about what she learned.

Todd Whitney


Turning on your faucet may be easy, but the process of getting you that water is anything but. Water has a long journey to get to your tap, often starting in the mountains, traveling through aqueducts, and stopping over in reservoirs along the way. The reservoirs that hold our water can sometimes take on a life of their own, supporting whole ecosystems of animals and plants. 

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Feb 10, 2015
Dan Brekke / KQED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Locally and Nationally, renters pay dearly to cut commutes // SF GATE

http://ca.water.usgs.gov/

To what extent is climate change causing or worsening California's drought, and how is the drought similar to other extreme weather events like superstorm Sandy? Columbia University climatologist Adam Sobel joins us to talk about the current drought, its causes, and how we can manage the increasing risk of future natural disasters.

Guest:

Adam H. Sobel, Professor of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University. He is also the author of Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate, and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.

On the November 12th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’re discussing the current state of the drought. A dozen communities across the state are at risk of running out of water, and at least 700 households already lack access to running water. Farmers have left nearly a half-million acres of land unplanted. How will new groundwater regulations and Proposition 1 impact water usage? What do you want to know about the drought? Is it affecting your area? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

On the September 29th edition Your Call, we’ll have a debate about Proposition 1, the ballot initiative that would authorize a 7-and-a-half billion dollar state bond for water infrastructure projects. Proponents say Proposition 1 will clean up groundwater, expand recycling and storage capacity. Opponents say it’s too vague and does nothing to address long-term water shortages in California. It’s six weeks from Election Day - what questions do you have about Proposition 1?   Join the conversation with David Onek and you.

Guests:

Your Call: How should we cope with extreme drought?

Aug 7, 2014
(Holly Bailey/Yahoo News)

  

 

 

On the August 7th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation about the most severe drought in California's history. Nearly 60 percent of the state is in exceptional drought. Groundwater reserves are being depleted at record rates as wildfires break out north and south. What can the media and governments do to increase understanding of the severity of this drought? What is the state doing to conserve water, and how much is left? Join us on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

  

Courtesty of the Pacific Institute

As California faces an extreme drought, water politics are under a microscope now more than ever. Oakland-based Pacific Institute is a leader in research on the impacts of climate change on water. Its director, Peter Gleick, was awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship for his work on water resources.

Even though 38 million Californians cook, clean and bathe with water, the Central Valley is still the largest user by far, taking up 75 percent of the state's water supply. Gleick sat down with KALW's Ben Trefny to decipher the state's water issues. 


The coming salmon drought

Feb 12, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

  

California's thirsty almonds

Feb 5, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Does San Francisco Have Enough Water?

Jan 21, 2014
Eric Luebenhusen / U.S. Department of Agriculture

Does San Francisco have enough water?  California is experiencing a record-breaking drought, and Governor Jerry Brown is asking Californians to reduce their water usage by 20%. Host Joseph Pace and guests look at the Bay Area's water supply and explore what an even drier place - Las Vegas - can teach us about urban water conservation.

Producer:  Wendy Holcombe

 


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