earthquake

Isabel Angell

Throughout film history, the Golden Gate Bridge has been leveled in earthquakes, ripped apart by apes, melted, and even bitten in half by a mega-shark.

But how would the iconic span fare in more realistic disaster scenarios? We're going to take a close look at three very real situations – overcrowding, a tsunami, and an earthquake – and find out if those disasters could bring down the Golden Gate Bridge.

Hassan Astaneh is a professor of structural engineering and bridge engineering at UC Berkeley.

Daily news roundup for Monday, March 16, 2015

Mar 16, 2015

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Diablo Canyon nuclear plant safe in earthquakes, PG&E says in report // LA Times

"California’s last remaining nuclear power plant can safely withstand earthquakes, tsunamis and flooding, according to documents submitted by the owner of the Diablo Canyon plant to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, March 12, 2015

Mar 12, 2015
Dan Rosenstrauch/Bay Area News Group

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

New era of testing begins in California schools // Contra Costa Times

Bilha Sperling

The new play Faulted follows one character’s prediction of the next big California earthquake, and her struggle to convince everyone else before it’s too late.

KALW's Julie Caine spoke to Evren Odcikin, the play's director, and Deborah Eliezer, who plays the lead role of "Aurora" in the show, about what it means to face one of our biggest collective fears.

The show opens November 14. Click here for more information.

To hear the full interview, click on the audio player above.

Isabel Angell

Throughout film history, the Golden Gate Bridge has been leveled in earthquakes, ripped apart by apes, melted, and even bitten in half by a mega-shark.

But how would the iconic span fare in more realistic disaster scenarios? We're going to take a close look at three very real situations – overcrowding, a tsunami, and an earthquake – and find out if those disasters could bring down the Golden Gate Bridge.

Hassan Astaneh is a professor of structural engineering and bridge engineering at UC Berkeley.

Leila Day


Yesterday’s 6.0 earthquake, reportedly originating along the the West Napa Fault, was felt across the Bay Area, but most of the damage was in Napa, Vallejo and the surrounding areas. 

Under CC license from Flickr user Boston Public Library. (https://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/13269647935) / Kilburn, B. W. (Benjamin West), 1827-1909 (photographer)

The shift in landscape is inevitable, especially when you live on a fault-line, like many of us on the West Coast do. A recent report from the US Geological survey found that California’s earthquake map extends over a wider area than previously thought, raising hazard estimates for places like San Jose and Vallejo while reducing estimates in Oakland.

This raises questions about what life in the Bay Area would be like after a major earthquake, and how prepared we are to cope with it.

This past Monday, Riverside County experienced a magnitude 4.7 earthquake. That’s not really news for Southern California, but this is: an earthquake detection system accurately predicted it.

(San Jose Mercury News) // A 3.4 earthquake occurred at 1:13 am in San Jose this morning. The epicenter was located on San Felipe Road, 10 miles east of the Villages, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. No injuries or damage were reported...

A magnitude 2.4 earthquake struck near the intersection of Ygnacio Valley and Oak Grove roads in Walnut Creek just before 9am this morning. The "microquake" did not apparently result in any major property damange or injuries...