East Bay Express

PHOTO BY JUSTINE LEE

This week KALW teamed up with the East Bay Express to share essays by Bay Area residents about racial injustice in America. The series marks the two-year anniversary of Michael Brown’s death.

Bay Area Voices on Racial Injustice: “The fear was in my bones”

Aug 10, 2016
Photo by Lucy Kang.

In this week marking the two-year anniversary of Michael Brown’s death, KALW teamed up with the East Bay Express to share essays by Bay Area residents about racial injustice in America. 

Photo by Justine Lee.

As the Bay Area marks the two-year anniversary of Michael Brown's death, demands for police accountability continue in the aftermath of major scandals that rocked the Oakland and San Francisco police departments.

Courtesy of Bert Johnson/East Bay Express

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East Bay Express

East Bay Express Editor Robert Gammon stopped by KALW's studios last week, and shared his thoughts about bias in the media, and controversy in Oakland's City Council.  

In this web exclusive segment, Gammon shares his thoughts about the threats journalists face in the Bay Area and elsewhere in the world. 

East Bay Express Editor Robert Gammon recently wrote an article about the question of bias in media. The Express doesn’t shy away from controversy, recently publishing an investigation of ethical and legal violations by new Oakland City Council board president Lynnette Gibson McElhaney. 

East Bay Express Editor Robert Gammon recently wrote an article about the question of bias in media. I invited Gammon to our studios to share his thoughts on this recent report, as part of our ongoing series, “State of the Media.”

East Bay Express: Slow type

May 8, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express

East Bay Express: Back in the closet

Apr 30, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

From our partners at the East Bay Express

Who is Bryan Parker?

Mar 19, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Gay priest ousted by conservative bishop

Mar 6, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

When private patrols pull the trigger

Feb 27, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Oakland seeks to tighten rent control rules

Feb 19, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

The coming salmon drought

Feb 12, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Oakland cops think city is too liberal

Jan 29, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

An urban farm collaborative grows in Albany

Dec 18, 2013

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

East Bay Express: Measuring food waste

Dec 5, 2013

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Why black students are avoiding UC Berkeley

Nov 7, 2013

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

What a Waste

Oct 24, 2013

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Who's patrolling the patrols?

Oct 17, 2013

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

East Bay Express: zombie properties spread in Richmond

Oct 10, 2013

Jose Rodriguez, a stocky auto mechanic from Jalisco, Mexico, has been squatting in a vacant home in Richmond's Iron Triangle for the past four months. "I like this property. I've already spent $5,000 repairing it," Rodriguez told Richmond police officers last week, as they were kicking him out in order to demolish the site. "I didn't do anything wrong."

As the tsunami of foreclosures in Oakland finally subsided over the past year, residents of the city's flatlands neighborhoods looked around at the new landscape and saw less room for themselves and people like them. Many of their neighbors were gone, of course. And many of the foreclosed homes were snapped up — not by new homeowners, but by large-scale investors, including national and global corporations.

If you're still trying to understand what exactly BART and its unions are fighting over, you're not alone. Obviously, the fight is over compensation, but many of us are unclear as to what each party is really asking of the other. Even bargaining representatives on both sides are having a hard time agreeing on the factual differences between their own proposals. Last Wednesday, union and management teams sat down just to clarify some of their financial assumptions — assumptions that have led to multimillion-dollar disagreements over what each side is truly proposing.

For the better part of two decades, Oakland residents have often objected to the city's process for taking complaints about police officers. Under the city's system, residents who want to make a complaint against a particular officer must make that complaint to a uniformed cop working for OPD's Internal Affairs Division. For some, the setup was intimidating, and it also bred cynicism because internal affairs routinely dismissed most of the complaints.

East Bay Express: When you can't understand your doctor

Sep 12, 2013

Gloria Estela Ortiz Ramos doesn't speak English, so when she became ill in 2006 and needed medical care, she had to rely on her ten-year-old son for help. He translated a list of medication prescribed to her from the Eastmont Wellness Center, an East Oakland clinic that serves low-income people. But the El Salvadoran immigrant said she expressed concerns to her medical provider, because her son had just started to learn English himself.

For the past decade, California has been a leader in the clean-energy revolution. Groundbreaking state laws require our major utilities to purchase 33 percent of their power from renewable sources by 2020. And some green-energy experts expect that mandate to rise to 50 percent or more in the following decade. To date, the rapid growth of solar and wind power has fueled the move to renewables. But for California to fulfill its green-energy future, it must solve an important problem: how to deliver electricity to consumers when the sun isn't shining and the wind isn't blowing.

Brad Wenner

In June, Peet's Coffee & Tea dispatched a truck emblazoned with the motto, "Proof in Every Single Cup," to drive across the country. Every few days the mobile cafe pulls up to the sidewalk of a different city, and the baristas on board hawk free cups of the company's new single-serve coffees. They set out tables and chairs, place sandwich board advertisements along the sidewalk, give out orange-rimmed sunglasses, and take photos of smiling customers clutching Peet's cups.

The deadly disease lies dormant during dry summers in Central California, but it comes alive when the rains arrive in fall. Causing flu-like symptoms, it goes airborne, with spores that root in the soft tissue of your lungs. Californians have a higher chance of contracting the disease than chickenpox, hepatitis, or West Nile virus, according to the health care news organization Reporting on Health. The fungal infection known as valley fever also has a preference for people of certain ethnic backgrounds. In the prisons of California's Central Valley, about 70 percent of the victims have been African-American.

East Bay Express: Unionizing Nonprofits

Aug 8, 2013

When employees of Larkin Street Youth Services in San Francisco began talking about unionizing earlier this spring, their concerns centered on issues familiar to workers of all stripes: understaffed departments, increased workloads, benefit cuts, high turnover. Although an attempt to unionize in October 2010 was unsuccessful, most employees at the homeless services nonprofit believed that the effort would end differently this time around.

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