Education

Education news

As 2015 comes to a close, BackStory is winding back the clock to hear what some favporite moments from the show have to say about the year’s major news stories.

What does the 19th century populist movement tell us about the 2016 presidential campaign? And how does the 1897 battle over America’s first long-distance oil pipeline connect to the Keystone XL debate? 

Hear all about it on BackStory, Monday, December 28th at Noon.

Your Call: Who's in charge of America's schools?

Dec 22, 2015

 On the December 22nd edition of Your Call, veteran education journalist Dale Russakoff joins us to discuss her new book The Prize, Who’s in Charge of America’s Schools? 

Angela Johnston

It’s the end of the week at Laurelwood Elementary, and the kids in Katy Howser’s kindergarten class are getting a quick lesson about bugs before they clean up and go home.

Stevie Evans has been a special education teacher for four years.

“I feel like when I first started this job, I was just thrown into the lions den,” she says. “I mean, I came into teaching through teach for America – and they really prepare you well for teaching.”

Your Call: Who was Jack London?

Nov 8, 2015

On the November 9th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with professor Cecelia Tichi about her now book “Jack London: A Writer’s Fight for a Better America.”

November 9, 2015.  In October Governor Brown signed two laws making changes to California's requirements for sex education in high schools. One of those laws makes California the first state to require certain high schools to teach about sexual violence prevention and the “yes means yes” sexual consent standard.  Host Joseph Pace talks with educators about the new laws on City Visions.

Nicole West

 

 

It’s a sunny, April afternoon at Richmond College Prep School. Around 20 fourth graders fidget at their tables near their outdoor garden. Each table is covered with placemats, bowls, cutting boards, and a recipe.

Your Call: Who's in charge of America's schools?

Oct 21, 2015

  On the October 21st edition of Your Call, veteran education journalist Dale Russakoff joins us to discuss her new book The Prize, Who’s in Charge of America’s Schools? 

Superindendent's Report

Oct 13, 2015

San Francisco Unified School District Superintendent Richard Carranza reports to the SF Board of Education at the meeting of Tuesday October 13, 2015.

Looking At Education with Carol Kocivar

Oct 13, 2015

Carol Kocivar talks today with Michael McFarland, the Student Member on the California State Board Of Education.

Mark Tuschman

On the Oct 6th edition of Your Call we'll have a conversation with Mark Tuschman about his new book “Faces of Courage: Intimate Portraits of Women on the Edge.” 

On October 5, 2015 City Visions examines Common Core.  California adopted the Common Core standards in 2010, and in the spring of 2014 the first tests were administered under the new regime.  The results are in, and there is much room for improvement.  

On the September 29th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with reporter Kristina Rizga about her new book “Mission High.”

Your Call: The dark history of California missions

Sep 13, 2015

On the September 14th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with award winning journalist Elias Castillo about his new book “Cross of Thorns: The Enslavement of California's Indians by the Spanish Missions."

18 in the Bay

Aug 24, 2015
Jiro Bevis for Matter

Turning 18 is a big deal. You can rent an apartment, you can get a tattoo, you can vote. Perhaps most importantly, you're legally recognized as an adult.

You might remember that moment yourself, but almost everything else about being that age is changing fast, even in the past few years. So what’s it actually like to be 18 right now?

On the August 24th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with founders of Voices of Witness, an oral history project, and book series that depicts human rights injustices through the stories of the men and women who experience them.

 

For decades, California’s public university system has been a model for the world, and its prestige has helped to create much of the state’s prosperity. More recently the system has been stumbling – a victim of constant budget cutting, chronic overcrowding, and administrative gridlock.



In 2011, about 82 percent of San Francisco’s students graduated from high school. Ten percent dropped out. Break it down by ethnic group and the numbers change in uncomfortable ways. For example, just 62.3 percent of the city’s African-American students graduated, and nearly 20 percent dropped out. The numbers for Latino students are similar. Kids need education and support, but resources are increasingly scarce. Often in these cases, in cities like San Francisco, nonprofits step in. Resources for those organizations are limited, too, but it helps to be able to show pretty much constant success.

ROCOR HTTPS://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/ROCOR/

Callie Jones is showing me how to 3-D print a tiny yellow chess piece, after designing it herself on a computer. It’s her second day in the 3-D printing club and she’s already a pro.

“So the printer’s like putting little dots on top of little dots on top of little dots, and so when the dots hit each other, they start to dry, and so it just starts to build up and up and up until you make the figure that it’s printing,” she explains.

August 3, 2015: On our next show, host David Onek will be one-on-one with the Superintendent of San Francisco Unified School District, Richard Carranza.

Hana Baba

Americans are often stereotyped as not knowing much about the rest of the world.  But, according to the numbers, it’s more than a mere stereotype. In the latest national geographic poll of geographic knowledge, American 18- to 24-year-olds place almost last, second only to Mexico.

Crayon Crunch

Think about some of the classics of children’s literature. There’s Where the Wild Things Are...Goodnight Moon...and Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs. Those are just a few books that have shaped the lives of many Americans. What do all these books have in common? They’re all about white people. And what do most children’s books have in common? They’re almost all about white people. Actually, just 10% of children's books published in the last 21 years are about people of color.  But a Berkeley-based children’s book company called Crayon Crunch wants to help change that. They’re publishing a book where parents and children can pick what the main character looks like. But what do kids think of having characters who look like them? And can one book really change the diversity problems in an entire publishing industry? 

On the June 15th edition of Your Call, we’ll hear stories of people who turned their lives around after spending many years in prisons and jails. The Welcome Home Project collects stories and photographs of 20 formerly incarcerated men and women who changed their lives around after spending many years behind bars. What stigma and barriers do the formerly incarcerated face? Join the conversation, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

On the June 9th edition of Your Call, we’ll bring back the conversation with Kirby Dick, director of The Hunting Ground, a new documentary about the epidemic of campus rape and sexual assault. One in five women in college are sexually assaulted. The federal government is currently investigating 100 colleges for mishandling or covering up rape cases. Who should be held accountable? And what actions should colleges take? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar.

Guests:

Sofi Karasek, co-founder of End Rape on Campus at UC Berkeley

My Favorite Teacher: David Christiano

May 29, 2015
Steven Athanases

In this installment of KALW’s “My Favorite Teacher” series, University of San Francisco professor Darrick Smith talks about a teacher who inspired him. 

Looking At Education with Carol Kocivar

May 26, 2015

Carol Kocivar speaks with Jesus Hoguin, President of the California School Boards Association.

SF School Board Superintendent's Message

May 26, 2015

San Francisco School Board Superintendent Richard Carranza's message delivered at the Board of Education meeting Tuesday May 26, 2015.

On the May 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with NPR’s Anya Kamanetz, about her new book The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed with Standardized Testing — But You Don't Have to Be. According to the Council of the Great City Schools, students take an average of 113 standardized tests from grades K through 12. What are the alternatives for tracking the success of students and schools? Where do you stand on testing? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Anya Kamenetz, NPR's education reporter

Pages