education

 

For decades, California’s public university system has been a model for the world, and its prestige has helped to create much of the state’s prosperity. More recently the system has been stumbling – a victim of constant budget cutting, chronic overcrowding, and administrative gridlock.


In 2011, about 82 percent of San Francisco’s students graduated from high school. Ten percent dropped out. Break it down by ethnic group and the numbers change in uncomfortable ways. For example, just 62.3 percent of the city’s African-American students graduated, and nearly 20 percent dropped out. The numbers for Latino students are similar. Kids need education and support, but resources are increasingly scarce. Often in these cases, in cities like San Francisco, nonprofits step in. Resources for those organizations are limited, too, but it helps to be able to show pretty much constant success.

ROCOR HTTPS://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/ROCOR/

Callie Jones is showing me how to 3-D print a tiny yellow chess piece, after designing it herself on a computer. It’s her second day in the 3-D printing club and she’s already a pro.

“So the printer’s like putting little dots on top of little dots on top of little dots, and so when the dots hit each other, they start to dry, and so it just starts to build up and up and up until you make the figure that it’s printing,” she explains.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, May 21, 2015

May 21, 2015
Mike Koozmin/The S.F. Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

SF schools are developing computer science curriculum for all grade levels // SF Examiner

It’s 8:08am, the Friday before spring break, and under other circumstances Kathleen Byrnes would already be at work.

“We would be in our classrooms preparing for the day, which is where we would rather be,” she says.

The Special Education Rights of Special Needs Children required by the Individuals With Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA).
Guest: M. Lynn Hansen, an attorney who represents Special Needs Children.
Listeners with questions for Chuck and M. Lynn Hansen please call 415-841-4134.

 

Beginning next fall, all San Francisco public schools will offer a class called Ethnic Studies. It’s a look at American history and culture from the perspective of people who aren't white. It’s also a chance to break down race in the classroom, and deal with tough concepts like unconscious racism and structural inequality.


Daily news roundup for Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Feb 11, 2015
Larry Zhou

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

LGBT Community Holds "Die In" For SF Transgender Woman Killed in Stabbing // NBC Bay Area

"Hundreds of people came out Tuesday and staged a die-in in front of San Francisco City Hall to honor all those transgender people who have died violent deaths.

Illustration by Greg Palena

 

There was a man who stopped eating. Not because of his health or weight or spirituality. He was saving his appetite for a big feast that was one week away.

Why am I telling you this?

Under CC license from Flickr user Charlie Nguyen.

The University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is one of the most prestigious in the country. It’s not cheap: it costs more than $15,000 per year for California residents and twice that for out-of-state students. And last month, the Board of Regents made it even more expensive, charging an extra $7,500 per year. 

Rhian Miller

There’s a lot of talk in education circles these days about changing to the common core curriculum or changing from books to computers. But at Life Learning Academy High School, or LLA, Principal Teri Delane is focused on making some more significant changes.

“We have a wonderful school that is a small school on Treasure Island that is actually changing kids lives,” she says. “When you have 90% of the kids who are killed in San Francisco, killed because they dropped out of school, it is my job to make sure they stay in school.”

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Courtesy of oaklandnorth.net

Antwan Wilson is the new head of Oakland Unified School District. Wilson spent five years as Assistant Superintendent of Schools in Denver before coming to Oakland schools last July. He arrived with a reputation for turning things around.

 

On October 22nd, the Second District PTA hosted a forum featuring eight candidates for three seats on San Francisco's Board of Education.

The forum was moderated by San Francisco Chronicle Education Reporter Jill Tucker, and was co-hosted by Parents for Public Schools of San Francisco, San Francisco Education Fund, Support For Families Of Children With Disabilities, and the San Francisco Parent Political Action Committee.

The debate over more charter schools in Oakland

Oct 22, 2014

Betsy Rubio is seven years old, and lives on MacArthur and 77th in the Castlemont neighborhood of East Oakland. But she attends Urban Montessori school, about 30 minutes away by bus. She told me about her first week of second grade. "First we go to morning circle, to figure out some rules. And then something called read aloud, where the teacher reads and we draw."

Note: The San Francisco Unified School District owns KALW's broadcast license. 

(Rich Pedroncelli / AP)

 

  

On the October 2nd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss bills that impact everything from labor and education to groundwater and healthcare. Governor Brown just signed the country’s first ban on single-use plastic bags. He also signed bills to give workers 3 sick days a year, redefine sexual consent on college campuses, and extend housing to foster youth up to age 25 if they are completing a secondary education. What bills are you watching? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Your Call: What pressures are teachers under today?

Sep 11, 2014

  

 

 

On the September 11th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession. The book chronicles the history of teaching in America and how it impacts current teacher struggles. With federal governments, parents, and school reformer groups telling teachers what to do, how does it affect teachers’ ability to actually educate? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

 

Guest:

 

  

  

 

 

On the August 27th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll open up the lines to answer your questions about the best options to pay for college. The average college graduate owes almost $30,000 in student debt. At the same time, tuition is up and families’ incomes are down. Which student loans offer the safest repayment options and lowest interest rates? What are the responsibilities of a co-signer? What questions do you have about student loans? It’s Your Call, with Holly Kernan, and you.

 Guests: 

Melanie Young

With the start of a new school year, families all around San Francisco are sending their children off with hopes for a good year and a bright future. But according to Carolina Guzman with the nonprofit Mission Economic Development Agency, or MEDA, children in the Mission District struggle on every rung of the education ladder. She says half the children entering kindergarten aren’t prepared to learn.

Your Call: How are students paying for college?

Jul 31, 2014

On today's Your Call, we’ll rebroadcast a conversation about the underlying reasons for the rising cost of higher education. According to the College Board, over the past 30 years, average tuition at a four-year public college has risen by more than 250 percent, while family income has gone up only 16 percent. So how are families and students paying for college? What role should the federal government play to make college affordable? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.  

Guests:

CCSF

City College of San Francisco is now able to stay open for another two years while it meets accreditation standards, according to the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges.

This is a relief for the college which has feared closure since last July, when the commission decided to terminate the college’s accreditation this coming July.

Rocor https://www.flickr.com/photos/rocor/

Callie Jones is showing me how to 3D print a tiny yellow chess piece, after designing it herself on a computer. It’s her second day in the 3D printing club and she’s already a pro.

AAUW website

Education has always played a key role in social change, but it hasn’t always been equally available to both men and women. In the late 1800’s less than 1% of women between the ages of 18 to 24 were in college. College-educated women knew they were privileged, and decided to use that power to work for social justice. They created what became known as the American Association of University Women (AAUW). The San Francisco chapter is the oldest branch in California, and the third oldest in the country.

V Smoothe, Flickr

It’s 7:30 in the morning at Skyline High and the halls are humming with activity. Kids are talking and slamming lockers. It’s loud.  But one building’s playing a different tune.

Richard Spitler / Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License

 

Sonia Black is walking through the halls of Skyline High School, trying to get the last few kids to class.

Black is in charge of discipline and attendance for ninth and twelfth graders at Skyline. She’s been at the school for two years and this year, they’re trying something new: restorative justice.

Paying to ride the school bus

Jun 2, 2014
H. Micheal Miley

 

Skyline is one of 15 public high schools in Oakland and the only one located in the hills. The 42-acre campus is nestled among redwoods and million dollar homes.  Nearly 2,000 students attend this traditional campus and many value the diverse student body.  But that wasn’t always the case.

Skyline High opened in 1961, and was almost immediately surrounded by conflict. It’s proposed attendance zone was one mile wide, ten miles long, and based entirely in the hills, which excluded students from the flatlands. This kept the school racially, as well as economically, homogenous -- despite the fact that the city’s black population nearly doubled during the previous decade.

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