education

The debate over more charter schools in Oakland

Oct 22, 2014

Betsy Rubio is seven years old, and lives on MacArthur and 77th in the Castlemont neighborhood of East Oakland. But she attends Urban Montessori school, about 30 minutes away by bus. She told me about her first week of second grade. "First we go to morning circle, to figure out some rules. And then something called read aloud, where the teacher reads and we draw."

Note: The San Francisco Unified School District owns KALW's broadcast license. 

(Rich Pedroncelli / AP)

 

  

On the October 2nd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss bills that impact everything from labor and education to groundwater and healthcare. Governor Brown just signed the country’s first ban on single-use plastic bags. He also signed bills to give workers 3 sick days a year, redefine sexual consent on college campuses, and extend housing to foster youth up to age 25 if they are completing a secondary education. What bills are you watching? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Your Call: What pressures are teachers under today?

Sep 11, 2014

  

 

 

On the September 11th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession. The book chronicles the history of teaching in America and how it impacts current teacher struggles. With federal governments, parents, and school reformer groups telling teachers what to do, how does it affect teachers’ ability to actually educate? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

 

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On the August 27th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll open up the lines to answer your questions about the best options to pay for college. The average college graduate owes almost $30,000 in student debt. At the same time, tuition is up and families’ incomes are down. Which student loans offer the safest repayment options and lowest interest rates? What are the responsibilities of a co-signer? What questions do you have about student loans? It’s Your Call, with Holly Kernan, and you.

 Guests: 

Melanie Young

With the start of a new school year, families all around San Francisco are sending their children off with hopes for a good year and a bright future. But according to Carolina Guzman with the nonprofit Mission Economic Development Agency, or MEDA, children in the Mission District struggle on every rung of the education ladder. She says half the children entering kindergarten aren’t prepared to learn.

Your Call: How are students paying for college?

Jul 31, 2014

On today's Your Call, we’ll rebroadcast a conversation about the underlying reasons for the rising cost of higher education. According to the College Board, over the past 30 years, average tuition at a four-year public college has risen by more than 250 percent, while family income has gone up only 16 percent. So how are families and students paying for college? What role should the federal government play to make college affordable? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.  

Guests:

CCSF

City College of San Francisco is now able to stay open for another two years while it meets accreditation standards, according to the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges.

This is a relief for the college which has feared closure since last July, when the commission decided to terminate the college’s accreditation this coming July.

Rocor https://www.flickr.com/photos/rocor/

Callie Jones is showing me how to 3D print a tiny yellow chess piece, after designing it herself on a computer. It’s her second day in the 3D printing club and she’s already a pro.

AAUW website

Education has always played a key role in social change, but it hasn’t always been equally available to both men and women. In the late 1800’s less than 1% of women between the ages of 18 to 24 were in college. College-educated women knew they were privileged, and decided to use that power to work for social justice. They created what became known as the American Association of University Women (AAUW). The San Francisco chapter is the oldest branch in California, and the third oldest in the country.

V Smoothe, Flickr

It’s 7:30 in the morning at Skyline High and the halls are humming with activity. Kids are talking and slamming lockers. It’s loud.  But one building’s playing a different tune.

Richard Spitler / Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License

 

Sonia Black is walking through the halls of Skyline High School, trying to get the last few kids to class.

Black is in charge of discipline and attendance for ninth and twelfth graders at Skyline. She’s been at the school for two years and this year, they’re trying something new: restorative justice.

Paying to ride the school bus

Jun 2, 2014
H. Micheal Miley

 

Skyline is one of 15 public high schools in Oakland and the only one located in the hills. The 42-acre campus is nestled among redwoods and million dollar homes.  Nearly 2,000 students attend this traditional campus and many value the diverse student body.  But that wasn’t always the case.

Skyline High opened in 1961, and was almost immediately surrounded by conflict. It’s proposed attendance zone was one mile wide, ten miles long, and based entirely in the hills, which excluded students from the flatlands. This kept the school racially, as well as economically, homogenous -- despite the fact that the city’s black population nearly doubled during the previous decade.

Bridging the language gap for immigrant parents

Jun 2, 2014

Oakland’s Skyline High School has one of the most diverse campuses in California, with students coming from a wide range of backgrounds. That means some parents are not fluent in English, making it difficult for them to communicate with teachers and administrators. That is where the school's Family Resource Center comes in, helping to bridge the language gap with translation services.

A Day in the Life of a Skyline High Student

Jun 2, 2014

 

For many high school seniors the future is filled with excitement and uncertainty-- college applications, the prospect of saying goodbye to friends and family, and that occasional touch of senioritis. At Skyline High School in Oakland one student is trying to squeeze everything she possibly can into her final year. Here is a day in the energetic and jam packed life of Skyline student Hydea’ Burgess.

 

In 2012 Skyline's Black Student Union filed a complaint charging the school with discriminating against students of color. They accused Skyline of short-shifting black students, providing lackluster support which led directly to students not graduating. A lawsuit resulted in an agreement with the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, and Skyline and the Oakland Unified School District agreed to make some serious changes. Included in those reforms was a voluntary resolution plan to oversee the disciplinary methods toward African American male students.

 

San Francisco is home to more than 5 thousand people of Arab descent. And despite living in what is perceived as one of the most culturally competent, tolerant areas in the country, since 9-11, Arab students have been complaining of abuse, taunting, and discrimination.

The Arab Cultural and Community Center of San Francisco has developed a toolkit and curriculum to help teachers better understand their Arab students’ backgrounds, and, give them the tools to address difficult issues they deal with.

Natasha Mahia, a student at El Dorado elementary school in Visitacion Valley, is one of ROCK’s biggest fans. ROCK stands for Real Options for City Kids, an after-school and mentoring program for youth in Visitacion Valley.

Under CC license from Flickr user Kevin Krejci

Steve Sacks is the PTA President at Alvarado Elementary School in Noe Valley. He takes a lot of pride in this small school and the education it provides to just over 500 students.

Life of the Law:  "School DisciplineAs the number of law enforcement officers on school campuses has gone up, so have the number of arrests. This month the Obama Administration issued recommendations for alternative forms of discipline -- but as the story of Kyle Thompson demonstrates, in the real world of schools, the issues are tricky.

  

Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth

Today we're talking about Restorative Justice and how some schools are shifting their approach to student discipline.  Eric Butler is the Restorative Justice Coordinator at Ralph Bunche High School in Oakland. There are over  20 schools in Oakland that have incorporated some sort of restorative approach to discipline. This means, instead of a punitive approach to issues at school, all parties are encouraged to address the harm that's done and then try to repair any harm that was caused in their community. Eric Butler says the approach is a complete shift from how schools traditionally deal with discipline.  

ERIC BUTLER: "We’re doing something different we’re apologizing for those messed up messages that we taught because we should’ve been teaching tolerance."

Click the audio player above to listen to the full interview.

Leila Day

Not long ago there was a food fight at Ralph Bunche High School. And Angel Hernandez is in trouble. He’s 18, a senior, and he’s not admitting anything happened. He’s slouched in his chair in a circle in a room whose walls are covered with positive messages: ‘Respect,’ ‘Listen,’ ‘Trust.’ His mom, Maria Ramirez, sits at his side. Also in the circle is the cafeteria worker Miss Mina, and she looks pretty ticked off. “Everybody starts throwing stuff,” she says. “I said excuse me, how old are you guys? You guys want to clean up my kitchen?”

Youth Radio podcast:  Civic Education for a New Generation

Contrary to popular belief, nearly 90 percent of high school students take a civics class. But what's the quality of those classes? This week's Youth Radio podcast looks at how racial and political diversity in the classroom affects what young people learn about politics and society.

99% Invisible:  Symphony of Sirens

AAYSP-MI

Not long ago, I attended a lecture at UC Berkeley’s Boalt Hall, the law school. It was just before sunset and about 100 Yemeni Americans – mostly young men – filled the room to see and hear their countrywoman, 34-year-old Tawakkul Karman. She’s the activist and revolutionary, who won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize for sparking the revolution that ousted Yemeni president Ali Abdalla Saleh.

50 years beyond the dream

Aug 28, 2013

It was 50 years ago today that over 250,000 people gathered in Washington for the Jobs and Freedom March. On that day, Martin Luther King JR made one of HISTORY’S most famous speeches: “I Have a Dream.”

Youth Radio: Staying off probation, and teaching others how

Aug 22, 2013

In 2008, Reinaldi Gilder promised himself that he would never go back to jail. Since his release in December of that year, he’s not only managed to keep his word, he has also shown others that they can do the same.

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