education

At 8 o’clock on a Tuesday morning, about 400 students stand at attention. They’re outside the Fruitvale Oakland elementary school, Learning Without Limits (LWL). They recite the following vision statement, as they do every day upon arrival: “We stand on the shoulders of those who came before us as we grow into leaders who are passionate and care about making our world better. We are equipped with skills and knowledge, filled with curiosity and we know that even when we face challenges, we will achieve!”

From the projects to the putting green

Jun 12, 2012

The Visitacion Valley Middle School is located in the southern part of San Francisco – one of the poorest residential areas of the city. It's recess and kids are outside playing the typical sports: football, basketball. But at this school, there's also golf.

Tony Anderson, Visitacion Valley's site director, works with 20 to 30 kids every day at the schools practice range. One is a 13-year-old named Faletui Manu. “Manu is one of our students who's been with us. He's just walked up to practice on his little chip here,” says Anderson, before congratulating Manu on a nice shot.

Photo by Denise Tejada

Youth employment in the United States is the lowest it’s been in 60 years, according to the Pew Research Center. Young people graduating from high school struggle to find jobs, and also face brutal college tuition costs. Educators are struggling to really prepare their students in high school for a career.

According to Forbes Magazine, careers in the healthcare sector are among the top recommended jobs for young people, because they include entry level opportunities and don’t always require a college degree.

Forget Med School, Become A Plumber Says Thiel

May 29, 2012
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nazareth_college/3524879265/

Peter Thiel, prominent venture capitalist and founder of PayPal, recently claimed on 60 Minutes that plumbers make more money than doctors. So why bother with higher education? It’s expensive, and you can get an equally well-paying job without it, goes the rationale.

Courtesy of www.readingpartners.org

This week, the California Department of Education gave us some grim news: according to its biannual report on the financial health of the state’s school systems, nearly one-fifth of school districts in the state face bankruptcy, and that includes six Bay Area districts – four in Santa Clara County and two in San Mateo County.

Dr. Wes Watkins, IV has built his whole life’s work around the idea that there’s no better example of democracy than a Jazz ensemble. Dr. Watkins is the founder of the Bay Area-based Jazz & Democracy Project. He devised a curriculum that teaches schoolchildren lessons in jazz alongside American history and the democratic process.

(Sacramento Bee) // The number of California high school graduates attending out-of-state colleges is rapidly increasing, leading some experts to warn of a potential “brain drain…”  

As the possibility of another $200 million cut in CSU funding looms this year, all eyes are on the November elections to see whether or not voters will approve Governor Jerry Brown’s tax initiative. It would increase taxes by one percent for Californians earning over $250,000, by two percent for those earning $500,000, and temporarily increase the sales tax by half-a-percent. If it’s not approved, CSU funding will be cut.

The Minerva Project: an elite online university

Apr 11, 2012
Image courtesy of www.minervaproject.com

Ben Nelson, the founder of the online photo finishing company Snapfish, just received $25 million from Benchmark Capital in Silicon Valley, to launch what he claims is the answer to the  “lockjaw” problem at elite universities. In other words, top tier schools are overcrowded and unable to expand their undergraduate capacity, resulting in droves of qualified applicants turning to less prestigious institutions. His idea is called the Minerva Project, an online elite university.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/wendt-library/4080320621/

Popular California community college, Santa Monica College, recently decided to start offering more sections of its most popular classes during the summer for five times the amount they normally cost, according to the Atlantic. The reason the tuition is so high is because these sections are not subsidized by the state.

kcet.org

 

On today's Your Call we’ll talk about education success stories.  With another round of severe budget cuts and a heated debate about education reform led by corporate funded think tanks, we’re taking a step back to talk about what’s actually working in our schools. Smaller class sizes? Textbooks that are more relevant to everyday life? More support for teachers?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. What works in your local schools?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests

European Commission

In last week’s State of the Union address, President Obama proposed something radical, that dropping out of high school no longer be allowed. But that might be complicated. Every school district has tried numerous solutions to the dropout dilemma without success.

County officials are struggling to provide mental health care for newly released state prisoners under a new law that transfers responsibility for some convicts from the state to local agencies...

Outside the prisons, a state and federal program designed to expand health care coverage for the uninsured will help counties bring more mental health coverage to adults who need it...

Pages