election

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San Francisco paints itself as a green city, a city of walkers and bicyclists, a transportation friendly city. But some say San Francisco has taken its pro-pedestrian stance too far.

A group called the Restore Transportation Balance Coalition wants to take back the roads. That’s the goal of Proposition L, a declaration of policy to make the city’s parking meters, garages and traffic laws more car-friendly. But at what cost?

 

  

On the October 29th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a debate on Proposition 46, the ballot initiative that would raise the cap on damages in malpractice suits and enforce mandatory drug testing on doctors. Supporters of Proposition 46 argue that medical negligence is too common and pain and suffering damage awards are too low. Opponents say the initiative isn’t about protecting patients, but increasing medical lawsuit payouts to trial lawyers. Election Day is next week - what questions do you have on Proposition 46? It’s Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.

Under CC license from Flickr user Scott2342

When you go to vote next Tuesday, the first thing you’ll see in the list of state measures is Proposition 1. It’s also being called “the water bond”. And let’s get one thing straight right now – this bond won’t resolve the current drought. We can’t vote to make it rain.

But, Proposition 1 can make it rain in the form of $7.5 billion worth of funding for water projects around the state. These could include projects that recycle, conserve, and store more of the water we already have.

CUESA, the Urban Agriculture Alliance and the SF-Marin Food Bank recently hosted Your Food, Your Vote, a food-focused forum with State Assembly District 17 candidates David Chiu and David Campos.

 


On November 4th, Oakland voters will pick their next mayor. All month on “Crosscurrents,” we are going to bring you the voices of each of the 15 people who are campaigning for the job.  

Candidate Nancy Sidebotham has lived in Oakland for fifty years, and she is no stranger to campaigns and Oakland city elections. 

Audrey DIlling

Palo Alto is one of the country’s wealthiest cities. Yet, a recent study by the Council on Aging Silicon Valley found that more than 20 percent of residents over 60 years old live near or below the poverty line. This reality makes competition stiff for the limited affordable housing options available.

Liz Pfeffer

Once blighted and clogged with cars, the Embarcadero is now a promenade of upscale restaurants, farmers markets, and a walkable Bay Trail. As development all over San Francisco barrels forward, residents are being asked to decide what they envision for the future of the city’s frontage.

Tomorrow, San Francisco voters will cast ballots for or against a controversial luxury condo development across from Pier 3. The long-disputed 8 Washington project would bring multimillion-dollar housing to a 3.2-acre lot on the city’s waterfront.



As a public service, I'm going to tell you right here and now who wins this thing and why...

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