Paul Ryan and the youth vote

Aug 29, 2012

Paul Ryan was officially nominated yesterday as Mitt Romney’s vice presidential running mate. There’s a lot of excitement about the choice, some of it because of the hope that Ryan’s youthfulness can benefit the party’s image.

When you talk to young conservatives at the Republican National Convention in Tampa about their vice presidential candidate, they’re nothing short of dreamy-eyed. Ryan is about as close to a bona fide celebrity as the party’s got.  What congressman wouldn’t welcome the comparisons we heard — to stars like Paul Rudd, Ryan Gosling, and Carson Daly?

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about how the party’s platform has changed since 2008. The platform draft says it opposes abortion in all cases with no exceptions for rape or incest and supports a voucher system for healthcare for seniors. Who is setting the agenda? How important is the platform? Join us at 10am PST or post a comment here. Whether or not you identify as a Republican, what does the party’s platform mean to you?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.


The Republican National Convention is underway in Tampa, Florida, after being postponed because of Hurricane Isaac. Although it’s been on the quiet side overall today, we were curious as to what the mood is like, what delegates are talking about, and what to expect over the next few days. San Francisco Examiner contributor Melissa Griffin is on the ground in Tampa. She spoke with KALW’s Hana Baba about her impressions on how the event is shaping up so far.

Listen to the full interview above.

A few words on Mitt Romney's vice presidential pick, Paul Ryan: the big-time budget guru of the G.O.P. Everyone keeps calling it a "bold choice." Yeah, well maybe, but you know bold is not always synonymous with good.

Whiskey for breakfast is a bold choice. Spun glass underwear is bold. Four-head dragon tattoos. Passing an 18-wheeler on a blind curve going 80 in the rain – incredibly bold. Just not that necessarily smart.

On Today’s Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the future of small business sector. According to small business association firms with fewer than 500 employees provide jobs for over half of the nation's workforce. How do the close ties of both major parties to big business shape their approach to small business?  Join us live at 10am PST or post a comment here. If you are a small business owner, what policies do you support? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.


Jere Glover, the Executive Director Small Business Technology Council

Today on Your Call: Who are the independents?

Aug 26, 2012

On today’s Your Call, we’ll have an open lines to independents. According to a Gallup poll, more Americans identify as Democrats than as Republicans, 31 percent to 27 percent.  Last year, the percentage of Americans identifying as political independents increased to 40 percent. Do you identify as an independent? What issues are important to you? Are you voting? Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org? Where do independents fit within the two-party political system? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Could this be our last election?

Aug 22, 2012
Fletcher Oakes

Big money is a big issue in this election. Since the U.S. Supreme Court made its decision in the Citizens United case, an unlimited amount of corporate money is flowing into the so-called “Super PACs” that support political candidates.

Planetary props to the city of London for a monumentally memorable 30th Olympiad. Added kudos for keeping the athletic contests pretty much politics-free, except of course for the monumental ugliness that was the women's semifinal field hockey match between Great Britain and Argentina (a.k.a. The Falklands War II, this time it’s personal!)

Will Durst here, wishing Mitt Romney the heartiest of welcomes home. He's got to be more relieved than a Midwestern corn farmer in the middle of a thunderstorm to be back on American soil. The GOP nominee embarked on a goodwill trip designed to raise his foreign policy bonafides, but the six-day charm offensive proved to be a bit light on the charm and rather heavy on the offensive. 

Who knows why Mitt Romney doesn’t release his old tax records. Obviously he's hiding something. But what?

So desperate to avoid the question, he ran away to the Olympics. Why? Because that’s where the cameras are pointed. And apparently he’s determined to get in front of them and not answer any questions about his taxes, which makes a person wonder even more what could possibly be buried under there. Is it too complicated for we mere mortals to understand. Or something nefarious?

Courtesy of Flickr user Clinton Steeds

One of the decisions Californians will make this June 5th is whether or not to change the amount of time legislators serve in office, mostly to lessen their terms from 14 years to 12. Prop 28 says that should happen, opponents disagree. As the discussion over legislative term limits heats up, the question at the core of Prop 28 is how long Californians think their representatives should represent them. Should they be left to serve longer and become more established as legislators? Or, should there be an encouragement of new blood in the State Assembly and Senate?

It’s once again time to play that quadrennial game sensation sweeping the nation: Guess the Vice Presidential Pick!

Since Mitt Romney has sewed up the Republican nomination tighter than one of Chris Christie’s old suits, the only drama left is which name the former governor of Massachusetts intends to place on the bottom of his bumper sticker. So let's look at the field of potential running mates. We'll start with the vanquished competition.

Now that the general election has unofficially begun, you and I and pretty much everybody dear to us, except for Kansas City Royals fans, are about to be buried under a blizzard of polls.

Remember when his own staffers said Mitt Romney had the conviction of an Etch-A-Sketch? Well stand back because, as we speak, the former governor from Massachussetts is being flipped over and shaken so hard, the fillings in the back teeth of his whole family are starting to rattle. What this all means is that we're entering the general election mode. So anything Mitt Romney might have said during the primary no longer applies.

A few words here for all my fellow Muppets, referring to Greg Smith, formerly of Goldman Sachs, who wrote an op-ed in the New York Times announcing he's out  of there due to his company’s extreme moral bankruptcy. According to Smith, associates are encouraged to rip off their own billion-dollar clients and regularly disparage them as Muppets.

And now your eagerly awaited Super Tuesday Report. Or perhaps it would be better to say Not So Super Tuesday report. More of a Frenetic and Confusing but Ultimately Unsatisfying with a Slight Aftertaste of Desperation Tuesday Report.

Don’t mean to overreact and risk boosting everybody’s blood pressure higher than opening offers on Facebook’s IPO, but this might be a halfway decent time to seek out a nice, safe, steel bunker to hunker down in or behind, because it’s awards season and heavy metal statuettes are being tossed around like dimes at a county fair. Like the flurry of résumés from the outer office of Michele Bachmann’s inner circle. As plentiful as the doubts currently circling Mitt Romney’s Super PAC.

There's something about Mitt. And whatever it is, a few folks are definitely allergic. Maybe they sense he has the same connection to humanity that a drive shaft has to bouillabaisse. Could be he's worth more than most small Balkan nations. Might be the Mormon thing or perhaps he just smells odd?

Will Durst here, with a few words on Barack Obama's third, and possibly last, State of the Union address. Although it's an election year, the administration went out of its way to reinforce that this was not a campaign speech, just a report on the progress being made. Apparently, the state of the union is pretty much exactly what we thought it was: good, getting better, but not quite great. Oh, it's definitely going to be great someday, because America has been great before and we will be great again soon. How soon? Well, that's the question. Tomorrow? Next month? 2014?


On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the Republican Party.  With the 2012 election cycle ramping up, we’re asking some fundamental questions: Who is the base of the Republican Party?  Who’s leading it?  Who’s paying the bills?  How has the party changed over the years and what are its principles and goals?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  What is your opinion of the Republican Party?  And what do you want to know about it?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.