employment

The costs of employing an American continues to grow at the same time as automation and offshoring become ever more tempting to employers. So where will the jobs be, especially the jobs that promise a stable, sustainable living? And what's the broader solution: What's the smartest approaches to encouraging the creation of sustainable jobs?

Under CC license from Andy Oakley

Three years ago, when Christian Hernandez was 16 years old, he recorded a joke voicemail greeting. It starts off with, “Hello. Hey! Uh, can’t understand you.” It’s meant to trick the caller into thinking it’s Hernandez on the phone. Eventually, callers hear, “Ha, voicemail! You know what to do stupid.” Now, at 19, Hernandez is looking for a job, and the greeting which started off as a joke for friends is now a liability.

Brett Myers

Seventeen year-old Andrew is filling out a job application for a Jamba Juice in Oakland, California. He’s making his way through the basics, filling out his name and contact information. However question five posed a challenge. It was a yes or no checkbox which read, “Have you ever been convicted of a crime?”

The older we get, the harder it is to think of ourselves as “old.” But as far as the government is concerned – specifically, the federal corrections system – you’re “aging” or “elderly” once you turn 50. California houses one of the country’s biggest populations of elderly prisoners. And gradually, it also releases them.

Finding work for ex-felons

Apr 4, 2013
Americaworks.com

Angel Barerra has a felony conviction. He thinks that’s kept him from finding work. In order to give people like Barerra a better chance, some California counties have implemented “Ban the Box” – they’ve made it illegal for employers to ask about felony charges on job applications.

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