environment

Photo by Genevieve Russell/modified from original

What if the root of all the world’s problems is the imbalance of masculinity and femininity in our leadership? 

Flickr user J R under CC BY 2.0

 

From switching to renewable energy to battery storage, to taxing drinking water. Out of the hundreds of bills that the California Assembly debated in the final hours of the legislative session this month, many dealt with water, climate change, and the environment. KALW's energy and environment reporter Angela Johnston shares some of the key environmental legislation now sitting on Governor Brown’s desk, and the ones that didn’t make it there.

Mapping West Oakland pollution, block by block

Aug 14, 2017
Laura Wenus / KALW

West Oakland has had an air pollution problem for years, and it’s taken a toll on residents. Emergency room visits for asthma are highly concentrated in West Oakland and Emeryville, but they drop off dramatically when you get to other parts of Oakland.

  

In 2006, Al Gore’s award winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth started a national conversation about climate change. What’s been accomplished since then?

 

Your Call: How does a melting Antarctica affect our planet?

Jun 11, 2017
Photo by Cristina Mittermeier

  

We’ll have a conversation about the seventh continent. The New York Times reports that miles of Antarctic ice are collapsing into the sea due to rising global temperatures.  

  

We’ll have a conversation about the health of the ocean’s corals and why it matters.  

Your Call: Trump vs. the Paris climate accord

Jun 2, 2017

 


On the next Your Call, it’s our media roundtable. This week we’ll discuss the Trump Administration and the Paris climate agreement.

 

What environmental protections have Congressional Republicans and the Trump administration reversed so far?

Cristina Mittermeier

 

How are photographers documenting the impacts of climate change and environmental degradation?

Bureau of Land Management

 

What is President Barack Obama’s environmental legacy?

In most Bay Area grocery stores, you can’t get free plastic bags anymore. San Francisco, all of Alameda County, and many cities in Marin and Contra Costa County have all banned bags. To find a grocery store giving out plastic bags for free, I had to drive to a Lucky in San Ramon.

ELECTION BRIEFS: Prop 65 & 67 - Grocery bags

Oct 21, 2016


Proposition 65 is about reusable bags. Namely, the paper bags and thick plastic bags that grocery stores and other stores sell to you and me. It would direct the profits from selling those bags to a new Environmental Protection and Enhancement Fund. So when you buy one of those bags, some of your money will go to wildlife conservation, drought mitigation, and beach clean-up.

 

Your Call: The 2016 Brower Youth Award Winners

Oct 12, 2016
Storyline Media


On the October 12 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with three of this year’s Brower Youth Award winners.

National Park Service

 

On the August 24th edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss threats currently facing national parks.

Angela Johnston

 

The California drought is now in it’s fifth year, and a recent study says it won’t be over for years to come. The study analyzed California’s mountain snowpack and found that we’d need almost four and a half more years of winter storms to escape drought conditions.  

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, June 9, 2016

Jun 9, 2016
from Flickr user miheco, used under CC BY-SA 2.0 // Resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Builders Pierce California’s Environmental Shield With New Weapon: The Ballot // NY Times

In a world that's rapidly becoming overpopulated, can we at least talk about population control?


Philosophy Talk asks about ancient wisdom for modern times

Apr 19, 2016

Could ancient virtues such as wisdom, courage, prudence, and justice help solve some of the most challenging problems of contemporary life? 


Angela Johnston

Up in the Silicon Valley foothills, there’s something that many Bay Area residents don’t even know exists. It’s deep and it’s full of dirt.

“It’s a very large hole in the ground,” says Kari Saragusa, CEO of the Lehigh Southwest Cement Company, just outside Cupertino.

Laura Flynn

On the October 29th edition of Your Call, we’re discussing how California can end fossil fuel extraction and embrace 100% wind and solar. Is that possible in the country’s third-largest oil-producing state? 

Under CC license from Flickr user Eric Goldberg

 

San Francisco voters will see two competing clean-energy propositions on their ballots in November: Propositions G and H. But, what they won’t see is that the electrical union workers union that wrote Prop G is now actually supporting H.

When construction workers break into the earth’s surface, it’s not unusual for them to discover ancient worlds. For example, on a 2013 dig, crews in San Francisco unearthed the remains of three mammoths and one giant bison. While working at the Caldecott Tunnel, fossil hunters discovered the remains of camels that once roamed the East Bay. There are actually provisions in California’s environmental laws that require anyone doing major digging projects to call fossil experts first, just in case. So when work began near Fremont to rebuild the Calaveras Dam, paleontologist Jim Walker was called to the scene to hunt for fossils. He expected to find a few, but the count surpassed 600.

Climate change--one view is doom and gloom and destruction. The other is that things could be far more beautiful and regenerative and sustainable and socially just than we can imagine. Is climate change an inevitability or an opportunity? Our guests are Shana Rappaport and Amanda Ravenhill of Project Drawdown, and Julia Prochnik, consultant to the National Resource Defense Council.

Women negotiating climate change. That's our inflection point.  

99% Invisible: Palm Reading

Apr 22, 2015

 

On a Friday evening in the summer of 2011, Los Angeles resident Brent Green was driving home from work and took a route he doesn’t usually take to get to his neighborhood. As he neared his home, he saw a work crew of about 25 guys in orange uniforms doing landscaping in a freeway berm.

He thought it all seemed a little odd.

For starters, it was 7pm on a Friday—late in the day for a city work crew. It was also piece of land that never got much attention; most of it was scrubby overgrowth. To Brent, this meant one thing.

They were stealing trees!

Philosophy Talk asks: What is Wilderness?

Apr 5, 2015

Nowadays we think of wilderness as a fully natural environment that contrasts sharply with the designed and constructed environments in which we normally move. But does that vision of wilderness really exist anymore? What is natural and what is artificial about wilderness? Should humans be understood as a part of nature or distinct from it? And how should we approach conservation efforts so that we balance the needs of a growing world population with the need to preserve some aspect of the wild in our lives?

The LA Times recently published an editorial that reported that California’s reservoirs are currently storing only about a year’s worth of water supply. Significant storms could still add to that supply, but it’s daunting data, coming at the tail end of the traditional wet season.

FSFSF: Sammy Obeid on the environment and bears

Mar 19, 2015


The number of chronically hungry people in the world is over 800 million, yet developed countries are facing health challenges from rising rates of obesity. The growing problems of food security and water scarcity seem an issue of distribution rather than availability. But other factors also influence the status of food and water security worldwide. So where does the problem with food and water security lie? Do developed countries – or any other entities or individuals – have any moral obligations to ensure a global network of water and food security?

Wikimedia commons user Gazebo

 

The Searsville Dam is causing big trouble on the peninsula. The 122-year-old, 65-foot-tall dam is closed to the public, hidden away on 1,200 acres owned by Stanford University.

Digging up ancient worlds

When construction workers break into the earth’s surface, it’s not unusual for them to discover ancient worlds. Last year, crews unearthed the remains of three mammoths and one giant bison in San Francisco. While working at the Caldecott Tunnel, fossil hunters discovered the remains of camels that once roamed the East Bay. There are actually provisions in California’s environmental laws that require anyone doing major digging projects to call fossil experts first, just in case. So when work began near Fremont to rebuild the Calaveras Dam, paleontologist Jim Walker was called to the scene to hunt for fossils. He expected to find a few, but the count surpassed 600.

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