Is the CA Environmental Quality Act Working?

Jan 29, 2013

City Visions takes up the movement to reform the California Environmental Quality Act -- hailed by some as our state's pre-eminent environmental law, but condemned by others as a vehicle for obstructionism. How has the 43-year old law helped -- or hindered -- the construction of environmentally sound projects in the Bay Area? What, if anything, needs to be changed?

Your Call: What are Your Hopes for 2013?

Jan 2, 2013

On today's Your Call we’ll talk about your hopes for 2013. We’ll delve into political hopes, environmental hopes, and community hopes. How might you change your community involvement in 2013? What are three simple things we might all do to make a positive change in the world? Join us at 10 am PST or post a comment here with your hopes for the new year. It's Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.


Ethel Long-Scott, Executive Director of the Women's Economic Agenda Project.

On Your Call, Thursday December 20th we aired a pre-taped conversation looking back at climate change activism over the last year.  What strides have we made? Where have we fallen short?  The UN climate talks in Doha, Qatar this month didn’t seem to move the international community any closer to solutions.  So what needs to be done?  Can local actions make a difference?  What are we facing for climate change in 2013?  


NAFTA's environmental impact on Tijuana 20 years later

Oct 24, 2012
Adrian Florido

When the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed 20 years ago, one of the big concerns was how the treaty would impact the environment.

After NAFTA was signed, eastern Tijuana experienced a building frenzy. One industrial park after another sprung up to accommodate the hundreds of American factories that came here in search of cheap labor.

Magdalena Cerda is an environmental activist, and she’s brought me to the edge of one of those sprawling complexes, to some barren, empty concrete basketball courts.

On today's Your Call, we’ll honor Indigenous People’s Day by speaking with native activists on the front lines of environmental battles.  From the tar sands in Canada, to coal mining at Black Mesa, to fracking, toxic waste, and deforestation-- native people are standing up for environmental justice in their communities.  Where do you see examples of this?  Join us at 10am Pacific or post a comment here.  What can we all learn learn from how native communities relate to the environment?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Under CC license from Flickr user katerha

In February, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved the expansion of our existing ban on plastic, single-use bags. By October of this year, we could see fewer plastic bags in our stores and landfills, as the law further cuts down on distribution.

Courtesy of eastbayexpress.com

Margaret Billsborough has survived unspeakable traumas: childhood abuse, wrenching poverty, homelessness, and crack-cocaine addiction. So when she, and many other vulnerable people like her, were given the opportunity to move into an apartment on San Francisco's Treasure Island, it seemed like a dream come true. Here, she thought, was a quiet, idyllic refuge where she could begin to heal.

Dianne Feinstein's Bad Oysters

Aug 27, 2012

Dianne Feinstein and other influential backers of a Point Reyes oyster farm have at times justified their support for it by contending that it's an environmentally friendly business. Feinstein and others have made this assertion in their attempt to convince the federal government to extend the oyster farm's lease at Point Reyes National Seashore, a move that would block the creation of the first marine wilderness on the West Coast.

The Sonoma Compost Company is just off Highway 101, northwest of Petaluma. All day, trucks haul in plant materials; others haul out soil. Sift through that soil, and you might find remnants of chicken feathers (apparently great for vegetable growers), rice hulls (nice for clay soils), and more.

European Commission

Pollution and the environment have always been big issues for Californians. A statewide survey conducted by the Public Policy Institute of California last month showed that approximately half the state’s residents see air pollution as a serious threat to their health.

Among African Americans and Latinos, concern is even greater.  The majority of those polled in these groups believe that people in lower-income areas are disproportionately affected by air pollution.

Restoring John Muir's Hetch Hetchy: Is It Worth It?

Aug 8, 2012

It’s been nearly 100 years since Congress authorized the City of San Francisco to build the O’Shaughnessy Dam in Yosemite National Park. This is the dam that turned Hetch Hetchy Valley into Hetch Hetchy reservoir, providing water and electricity to San Francisco and surrounding cities. John Muir and a emerging Sierra Club fought against this project proposal for nearly 12 years before Congress passed the Raker Act in 1913, giving San Francisco the authority to build the dam, power generators, and delivery system to the Bay Area.

Image courtesy of www.takepart.com/lastcall

It’s our planet’s most valuable resource, cities are powered by it, wars are fought over it, and life depends on it...

“We think of it as air, infinite and inexhaustible, but when you use water in such quantities that it exceeds the system’s capacity to renew itself, we’ve got a problem,” states the trailer for the new documentary film Last Call at the Oasis (view trailer below).


On today's Your Call we’ll reflect on Earth Day. Environmental journalist Mark Hertsgaard believes that Earth Day is becoming a bland, tired ritual that polluters and politicians have learned to ignore or co-opt. It’s time to reclaim Earth Day and return it to its 1970s roots when millions took to the streets. What will it take to get millions into the streets today? Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. How would you save Earth Day and the environmental movement? It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

California's outer coast once boasted 27 miles of Bay Area beaches. Up until the 20th Century, these beaches provided a natural buffer for the inner land areas; then came freeways, airports and downtowns. KALW's Ben Trefny spoke with Robin M. Grossinger, Senior Scientist and Historical Ecology Program Director at the San Francisco Estuary Institute about California beaches, landscape heritage and how some of these areas have rebuilt themselves.


On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Thomas Linzey, author of “Be the Change: How to Get What You Want in Your Communityand Shannon Biggs, author of “The Rights of Nature.” How can communities defend themselves from corporate interests? Are local laws the answer? Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. How are you organizing for change in your community? And what changes would you like to see? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.