environment

8:07am

Fri January 30, 2015
Arts & Culture

Philosophy Talk asks: Who's responsible for food (in)security?

The number of chronically hungry people in the world is over 800 million, yet developed countries are facing health challenges from rising rates of obesity. The growing problems of food security and water scarcity seem an issue of distribution rather than availability. But other factors also influence the status of food and water security worldwide. So where does the problem with food and water security lie? Do developed countries – or any other entities or individuals – have any moral obligations to ensure a global network of water and food security?

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5:31pm

Thu January 29, 2015
Health, Science, Environment

Stanford considering the fate of century-old dam threatening endangered trout

Seasrsville Dam
Wikimedia commons user Gazebo

 

The Searsville Dam is causing big trouble on the peninsula. The 122-year-old, 65-foot-tall dam is closed to the public, hidden away on 1,200 acres owned by Stanford University.

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4:08pm

Tue December 2, 2014
Health, Science, Environment

Imagining the giant hippos, monstrous sharks, and sea beasts of an underwater Silicon Valley

Construction site at the Calaveras Dam in the East Bay hills.

Digging up ancient worlds

When construction workers break into the earth’s surface, it’s not unusual for them to discover ancient worlds. Last year, crews unearthed the remains of three mammoths and one giant bison in San Francisco. While working at the Caldecott Tunnel, fossil hunters discovered the remains of camels that once roamed the East Bay. There are actually provisions in California’s environmental laws that require anyone doing major digging projects to call fossil experts first, just in case. So when work began near Fremont to rebuild the Calaveras Dam, paleontologist Jim Walker was called to the scene to hunt for fossils. He expected to find a few, but the count surpassed 600.

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12:11am

Tue December 2, 2014

12:00am

Wed November 26, 2014
Health, Science, Environment

Your Call: What are the hidden costs of carbon?

On the November 26th edition of Your Call, we’ll have conversation with investigative journalist and author Mark Schapiro about his new book, Carbon Shock: A Tale of Risk and Calculus on the Front Lines of the Disrupted Global Economy. He says the economic costs of carbon are often hidden, but we need to understand them in order to act. How are these costs effecting economies and changing our response to climate change? Join us on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar.

Guests:

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