environment

On the November 12th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’re discussing the current state of the drought. A dozen communities across the state are at risk of running out of water, and at least 700 households already lack access to running water. Farmers have left nearly a half-million acres of land unplanted. How will new groundwater regulations and Proposition 1 impact water usage? What do you want to know about the drought? Is it affecting your area? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

What Proposition 1 has in store for California's water

Oct 27, 2014
Under CC license from Flickr user Scott2342

When you go to vote next Tuesday, the first thing you’ll see in the list of state measures is Proposition 1. It’s also being called “the water bond”. And let’s get one thing straight right now – this bond won’t resolve the current drought. We can’t vote to make it rain.

But, Proposition 1 can make it rain in the form of $7.5 billion worth of funding for water projects around the state. These could include projects that recycle, conserve, and store more of the water we already have.

Fremont high school student Lynnea Shuck is being honored as one of the nation's top environmentalists. She and five others will receive the Brower Youth Award from the Earth Island Institute. The award is named after David Brower, an environmentalist who helped create the Point Reyes National Seashore and other nature preserves around the state and country.

Who’s ready to drink recycled water?

Oct 13, 2014
Audrey DIlling

Bay Area homes, businesses, and factories send about 550 million gallons of wastewater to treatment plants every day. That’s enough water to fill 750 Olympic-sized swimming pools. Just six percent of this water gets re-used for agricultural, industrial, and other non-potable purposes – meaning nobody drinks it. The rest gets discharged back into the Bay.

Picnpull

It’s early morning and my car is rattling loudly in the parking lot of the Pick-n-Pull auto dismantler in the industrial neighborhood of East Oakland near the Oakland Coliseum.

I’m here at Pick-n-Pull to sell my beat-up 1998 Subaru Outback Legacy to the State of California under the Consumer Assistance Program, or CAP. The program buys cars that don’t pass smog for $1000, or $1500 if the owner is low income. The state wants polluting cars off the road for good and the money is a big incentive for owners to participate in the program. It’s definitely why I’m here today ready to collect my check.

 

  

On the September 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call, Naomi Klein talks about her new book, “This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate”.  Klein says our current economic system can’t cut greenhouse emissions fast enough to prevent permanent warming.  As world leaders converge for the UN Climate Summit, is there still time to make the shift to sustainability?  And what would sustainability mean for the way we live?  Naomi Klein – on the next Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.    

Guest:

 


Your Call: What dangers do whales face today?

Aug 21, 2014

  

On the August 21st, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Joshua Horwitz, author of “War of the Whales.” Horwitz looks at the US Navy’s submarine surveillance system that floods the ocean with high-intensity sound. In 2008, the Supreme Court backed the Navy’s use of sonar, in spite of its deadly and effects on whales. And the Obama Administration recently OK’d the use of sonar for oil exploration off the East Coast. What impact does sonar have on whales? And what can be done to protect them? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Laura Flynn

The east side story

I’m on the east side of Alameda Island, standing in mud in front of a storm drain that empties out into San Leandro Bay. There’s a stretch of homes right on the shoreline looking out at estuaries, the Oakland Airport, and Coliseum. The waterline isn’t quite at my feet right now, but in less than a century I’d likely be standing in water up to my shoulders.

Fracking California: Can Jerry Brown be a climate leader if he does not oppose fracking?

Jun 17, 2014
Lisa Morehouse


When Jerry Brown stepped up to the microphone at the California Democratic Party’s convention in March, it looked like it might be an environmental love-fest. He was kicking off his campaign for a fourth term as governor of the state that is perhaps the world’s leading environmental trend-setter.

Laura Klivans

Betsy. Buttercup. Bambi. Those are not Disney characters but three of the eight female bison that live at the bison paddock in Golden Gate Park. Sarah King, the primary bison keeper, introduces me to them one afternoon. She works with fellow hoofstock fan, Jim Nappi, Curator of Hoofstock and Marsupials at the San Francisco Zoo. Nappi says he and King share a love for bison. 

Today on Your Call: Media Coverage of Climate Change

Jan 2, 2014


KALW's Maya de Paula Hanika

Tell us all about your home construction questions, experiences, and how our experts’ advice worked out for you using our FEEDBACK form.

Last summer, the people of Richmond were in shock from the explosion and following fire that broke out at the Chevron oil refinery in their city. Black plumes of smoke hovered over the Bay, and people filled local emergency rooms with respiratory complaints. Chevron blamed the explosion on a ruptured pipeline.

Under CC license from Flickr user Matt McGee

When we talk about climate change, it’s easy to get stuck in our terrestrial mammal mindset. Let’s face it: most of us are total dry land chauvinists. The only time we even notice something’s happening to the ocean is when it’s gnawing away at our coastline. But something else is going on just beneath the surface. Certain sections of the ocean are losing oxygen – and that’s just as bad for sea creatures as it would be for us.

East Bay Express: California gets fracked

Feb 6, 2013
Courtesy of EastBayExpress.com

Big Oil is rushing to extract fossil fuel from the state's underground shale formation. But will it contaminate — and waste — portions of our water supply?

Is the CA Environmental Quality Act Working?

Jan 29, 2013
http://www.conservation.ca.gov

City Visions takes up the movement to reform the California Environmental Quality Act -- hailed by some as our state's pre-eminent environmental law, but condemned by others as a vehicle for obstructionism. How has the 43-year old law helped -- or hindered -- the construction of environmentally sound projects in the Bay Area? What, if anything, needs to be changed?


Your Call: What are Your Hopes for 2013?

Jan 2, 2013

On today's Your Call we’ll talk about your hopes for 2013. We’ll delve into political hopes, environmental hopes, and community hopes. How might you change your community involvement in 2013? What are three simple things we might all do to make a positive change in the world? Join us at 10 am PST or post a comment here with your hopes for the new year. It's Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

 Guests:

Ethel Long-Scott, Executive Director of the Women's Economic Agenda Project.

On Your Call, Thursday December 20th we aired a pre-taped conversation looking back at climate change activism over the last year.  What strides have we made? Where have we fallen short?  The UN climate talks in Doha, Qatar this month didn’t seem to move the international community any closer to solutions.  So what needs to be done?  Can local actions make a difference?  What are we facing for climate change in 2013?  

Guests:

NAFTA's environmental impact on Tijuana 20 years later

Oct 24, 2012
Adrian Florido

When the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed 20 years ago, one of the big concerns was how the treaty would impact the environment.

After NAFTA was signed, eastern Tijuana experienced a building frenzy. One industrial park after another sprung up to accommodate the hundreds of American factories that came here in search of cheap labor.

Magdalena Cerda is an environmental activist, and she’s brought me to the edge of one of those sprawling complexes, to some barren, empty concrete basketball courts.

On today's Your Call, we’ll honor Indigenous People’s Day by speaking with native activists on the front lines of environmental battles.  From the tar sands in Canada, to coal mining at Black Mesa, to fracking, toxic waste, and deforestation-- native people are standing up for environmental justice in their communities.  Where do you see examples of this?  Join us at 10am Pacific or post a comment here.  What can we all learn learn from how native communities relate to the environment?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Under CC license from Flickr user katerha

In February, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved the expansion of our existing ban on plastic, single-use bags. By October of this year, we could see fewer plastic bags in our stores and landfills, as the law further cuts down on distribution.

Courtesy of eastbayexpress.com

Margaret Billsborough has survived unspeakable traumas: childhood abuse, wrenching poverty, homelessness, and crack-cocaine addiction. So when she, and many other vulnerable people like her, were given the opportunity to move into an apartment on San Francisco's Treasure Island, it seemed like a dream come true. Here, she thought, was a quiet, idyllic refuge where she could begin to heal.

Dianne Feinstein's Bad Oysters

Aug 27, 2012

Dianne Feinstein and other influential backers of a Point Reyes oyster farm have at times justified their support for it by contending that it's an environmentally friendly business. Feinstein and others have made this assertion in their attempt to convince the federal government to extend the oyster farm's lease at Point Reyes National Seashore, a move that would block the creation of the first marine wilderness on the West Coast.

The Sonoma Compost Company is just off Highway 101, northwest of Petaluma. All day, trucks haul in plant materials; others haul out soil. Sift through that soil, and you might find remnants of chicken feathers (apparently great for vegetable growers), rice hulls (nice for clay soils), and more.

European Commission

Pollution and the environment have always been big issues for Californians. A statewide survey conducted by the Public Policy Institute of California last month showed that approximately half the state’s residents see air pollution as a serious threat to their health.

Among African Americans and Latinos, concern is even greater.  The majority of those polled in these groups believe that people in lower-income areas are disproportionately affected by air pollution.

Restoring John Muir's Hetch Hetchy: Is It Worth It?

Aug 8, 2012

It’s been nearly 100 years since Congress authorized the City of San Francisco to build the O’Shaughnessy Dam in Yosemite National Park. This is the dam that turned Hetch Hetchy Valley into Hetch Hetchy reservoir, providing water and electricity to San Francisco and surrounding cities. John Muir and a emerging Sierra Club fought against this project proposal for nearly 12 years before Congress passed the Raker Act in 1913, giving San Francisco the authority to build the dam, power generators, and delivery system to the Bay Area.

Image courtesy of www.takepart.com/lastcall

It’s our planet’s most valuable resource, cities are powered by it, wars are fought over it, and life depends on it...

“We think of it as air, infinite and inexhaustible, but when you use water in such quantities that it exceeds the system’s capacity to renew itself, we’ve got a problem,” states the trailer for the new documentary film Last Call at the Oasis (view trailer below).

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