ethics

5:22pm

Wed April 29, 2015
Arts & Culture

What it really takes to make your chicken dinner

Under CC license from Flickr user David Goehring.

I killed my first deer in the backwoods of Wisconsin when I was 13 years old. This was the first time I really understood the existential price of eating meat: death. I continued hunting through my childhood, and still do. But when I moved to the Bay Area a year ago, I discovered that culturally, many people here are not okay with killing animals.

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6:00pm

Mon December 8, 2014
Technology

Robotic seals comfort dementia patients but raise ethical concerns

Paro the seal, charging by its electronic pacifier
Angela Johnston

At the Livermore Veteran’s Hospital, there are a few animals residents can see: wild turkeys that run around the grounds, rattlesnakes that hide out in the dry grass, and therapy dogs that make weekly visits. But there’s one animal in particular that Bryce Lee is always happy to see: a baby harp seal.

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9:04pm

Thu August 14, 2014
Arts & Culture

99% Invisible: An Architect's Code

Pelican Bay State Prison
California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Lawyers have an ethics code. Journalists have an ethics code. Architects do, too.

According to Ethical Standard 1.4 of the American Institute of Architects (AIA):  "Members should uphold human rights in all their professional endeavors." 

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11:47am

Sat August 9, 2014
Arts & Culture

The Ethics of Captivity on Philosophy Talk

Whether it's people incarcerated in prisons, or animals confined in zoos, aquariums, laboratories, farms, and in our own homes, millions of upon millions of sentient creatures live in captivity. To be held captive, some might say, is to be denied basic rights of autonomy. But physical captivity, others might say, can have significant social benefits. So under what conditions could it be morally justified to hold a creature in captivity? Should we think of humans and animals differently? And in a civil society, is captivity a necessary harm, or should we work towards eradicating it?

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11:10am

Thu March 27, 2014
Arts & Culture

The Ethics of WMDs on Philosophy Talk

The United States recently threatened military action against Syria in response to the Syrian government’s alleged use of chemical weapons. Similar threats have been made against states suspected of trying to develop nuclear arsenals such as North Korea and Iran. Yet the U.S., the U.K., France, Russia, and China have thousands of active nuclear weapons of their own. Is there a morally significant difference between nuclear or chemical weapons and conventional weapons? Should we work toward total disarmament, or do we need these weapons as a deterrent to rogue states?

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