Stephen Shames

 On the October 1st edition of Your Call, film director Stanley Nelson joins us to talk about his new documentary, The Black Panthers, Vanguard of the Revolution

San Francsico Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Librarians furious as Berkeley tosses thousands of books // SF Gate

“Librarians, normally a sedate bunch, were more steamed than a romance novel in Berkeley on Wednesday over efforts to cull the city collection without consulting them first.



Minnesota set to become 22nd medical marijuana state… Hash brownies could result in life sentence… Growers blocked from using “Federal water”…   FBI set to hire pot-smoking hackers… Synthetic drugs worry UN… More on “vape pens”… 


Details of State Senator Leland Yee's case

Apr 3, 2014

The San Francisco Chronicle has been reporting widely on the FBI’s investigation into Senator Leland Yee and 25 others who have been indicted in the past few days. The charges range from firearms trafficking to promising political favors.

San Francisco Chronicle reporters  Henry Lee  and Vivian Ho have been covering this unfolding story in detail and give us a recap of what we know so far. 

Flickr user --Mark--

State Democratic Senator Leland Yee has been charged with public corruption, after a series of raids this morning by the FBI and gang task force officials. Yee’s Senate office in Sacramento was searched, and he was arrested at his Sunset district home in San Francisco.

Your Call: Friday Media Roundtable

Jan 18, 2013

On today's Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of the elections in Israel. We’ll also be joined by journalist, Trevor Aaronson, to discuss his new book, The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's manufactured War on Terrorism. Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. Where did you see the best reporting this week? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Surveillance now takes many forms. From cameras on city street corners, to government traces of emails, texts, tweets, and phone calls, to the rise of domestic drones. It’s unclear, at this point, exactly how much we’re being watched, but we do know that the government – especially the FBI – has a history of surveillance, both legal and illegal. And we know that, in part, because of the work of people like Seth Rosenfeld.

On today's Your Call, we’ll speak with Seth Rosenfeld, author of Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals and Reagan's Rise to Power.  “Ultimately,” says Rosenfeld, “this is a cautionary tale about the dangers of secrecy and power.”  Join us at 10am PST or post a comment here.  What are your memories of activism in Berkeley in the 60s?  Or if you’re involved today, have you experienced repression?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.


On today's Your Call, we’ll talk with Tim Weiner [whiner], author of “Enemies: A History of the FBI.”  Weiner says “A secret police is anathema in a democracy.  But the FBI’s powers make it America’s closest counterpart.”  How has the FBI used its powers over the last century?  And how has it shifted the balance between national security and individual freedom?  Join us Monday at 10am PST or leave a comment here.  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan and you.


Tim Weiner, author of “Enemies: A History of the FBI”

Since 9/11, surveillance of Muslims has been on the rise. New York City made national news in February when the Associated Press broke the story about the NYPD spying on area mosques. AP won a Pullitzer Prize for that reporting.

About a month later, in March, we received similar news much closer to home. The ACLU announced it had documents showing the FBI spied on mosques here in the San Francisco Bay Area between 2004 and 2008.

On today's Your Call, we’ll mark the beginning of the 55th annual San Francisco International Film Festival by discussing one of it’s featured films--Jamie Meltzer’s Informant.  The film follows the story of Brandon Darby, a charismatic activist turned FBI informant. Since 9/11, the FBI has built a network of more than 15,000 informants. How much impunity does the FBI have for entrapment?

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Jonathan Macintosh

Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler has been a New York Times correspondent in Israel and Moscow. In his two most recent books, released earlier this year, he turns his attention to the erosion of civil liberties in the United States. In Rights at Risk and The Rights of the People, Shipler argues that both the War on Terror and the War on Crime have allowed the government to seep into Americans' personal lives in unconstitutional ways. Shipler discussed his new books with KALW's Criminal Justice Editor, Rina Palta.