FBI

12:00am

Wed September 19, 2012
FBI's war on Berkeley radicals

Today on Your Call: How and why did the FBI target radicals at UC Berkeley in the 60s?

On today's Your Call, we’ll speak with Seth Rosenfeld, author of Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals and Reagan's Rise to Power.  “Ultimately,” says Rosenfeld, “this is a cautionary tale about the dangers of secrecy and power.”  Join us at 10am PST or post a comment here.  What are your memories of activism in Berkeley in the 60s?  Or if you’re involved today, have you experienced repression?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.


Guest:

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9:23am

Mon June 18, 2012
History of the FBI

Today on Your Call: What can the history of the FBI teach us about how the agency works today?

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk with Tim Weiner [whiner], author of “Enemies: A History of the FBI.”  Weiner says “A secret police is anathema in a democracy.  But the FBI’s powers make it America’s closest counterpart.”  How has the FBI used its powers over the last century?  And how has it shifted the balance between national security and individual freedom?  Join us Monday at 10am PST or leave a comment here.  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan and you.

Guests

Tim Weiner, author of “Enemies: A History of the FBI”

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2:39pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Cops & Courts

FBI spies on Bay Area mosques

Islamic Society of East Bay

Since 9/11, surveillance of Muslims has been on the rise. New York City made national news in February when the Associated Press broke the story about the NYPD spying on area mosques. AP won a Pullitzer Prize for that reporting.

About a month later, in March, we received similar news much closer to home. The ACLU announced it had documents showing the FBI spied on mosques here in the San Francisco Bay Area between 2004 and 2008.

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12:00am

Thu April 19, 2012
FBI informants

Today on Your Call: How have informant laws changed since 9/11?

On today's Your Call, we’ll mark the beginning of the 55th annual San Francisco International Film Festival by discussing one of it’s featured films--Jamie Meltzer’s Informant.  The film follows the story of Brandon Darby, a charismatic activist turned FBI informant. Since 9/11, the FBI has built a network of more than 15,000 informants. How much impunity does the FBI have for entrapment?

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3:34pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Cops & Courts

Is there such a thing as privacy in America?

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Jonathan Macintosh

Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler has been a New York Times correspondent in Israel and Moscow. In his two most recent books, released earlier this year, he turns his attention to the erosion of civil liberties in the United States. In Rights at Risk and The Rights of the People, Shipler argues that both the War on Terror and the War on Crime have allowed the government to seep into Americans' personal lives in unconstitutional ways. Shipler discussed his new books with KALW's Criminal Justice Editor, Rina Palta.

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