Ferguson

Dorret / Flickr

  

On the August 12th edition of Your Call we’ll look back at how the death of unarmed teenager Michael Brown ignited the Black Lives Matter movement.

  

On the May 27th edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about what we can learn from police forces in other countries. Last year, British police fired their weapons just three times. Most police officers in Britain, Ireland, Norway, Iceland and New Zealand don’t carry guns, even when they’re on patrol. President Obama recently banned the sale of military equipment to local law enforcement agencies. How will this affect how US police handle conflict? What other changes should be made? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you. 

How does citizen oversight of police departments work?  On the next Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by discussing different models in Northern California. Where is citizen oversight working? San Diego, Oakland, Riverside, Long Beach, Sausalito, Novato, and Berkeley have review boards, but few people know these boards even exist. What power do citizen oversight boards have to ensure police accountability? How should these boards work? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

What role does implicit bias play in policing? On the January 28th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by discussing how unconscious racial bias affects police and community relations. Even those of us who believe in equality and fairness show significant patterns of bias. How are police departments dealing with this? Can officers be trained to recognize their biases and alter their behavior? What’s the most effective way to combat implicit bias? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

  

Who are police today? On the January 21st edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race and justice with a conversation about police departments across the country. The total number of minority police officers has risen, but they’re concentrated in larger cities. The percentage of white cops is more than 30 points higher than in the communities they serve, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. What does the police force look like in your area? It's Your Call, with me, Rose Aguilar, and you.

East Bay Express

The current unrest after police shootings of unarmed black men means the battle for racial justice is far from over. Jeff Chang is a journalist, cultural critic, and the head of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford. In his new book, Who We Be: The Colorization of America, he argues that the myth of multiculturalism has in some ways silenced a real conversation about racial disparity in America. KALW’s Sandhya Dirks sat down with Chang to talk about his new book, current protests over police shootings, and how to begin a conversation about race in America today.

Wikipedia Commons

On the January 5th, 2015 edition of Your Call, we'll speak with Richard Rothstein, research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and fellow at UC Berkeley. He argues that government actions like racially explicit zoning, public housing segregation, and federal requirements for white-only suburbs systemically segregated African Americans and set the stage for the protests and racial tension following the Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Missouri. How was our racial landscape created? And what's the way forward? It's Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

Desmond Cole

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...

Audio Pending...

On the December 18th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with activists about how this movement is organizing for lasting change. Last weekend, tens of thousands of people across the country marched to protest the shooting of black men. BlackLivesMatter is also receiving international attention and support. What is the end goal of this movement? And what will it take to get there? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

On the December 5th, 2014 edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll talk about news coverage of protest -- from Ferguson to New York, from Egypt to Hong Kong. We'll be joined Jadaliyya’s Adel Iskander in Cairo, long-time China reporter Mary Kay Magistad and Miami Herald columnist Leonard Pitts.  Join us on the next Your Call, with Matt Martin and you.

Guests:

Leonard Pitts, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist with the Miami Herald

On the November 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call:  Monday night's announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri had decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the killing of unarmed black youth Michael Brown led to outrage and protest nationwide.  President Obama and Michael Brown's parents called for peaceful protest -- but what does that mean, and how far should it go?  What will keep the focus on continued racial inequities in policing?  And how does the story of Ferguson resonate in the Bay Area and Northern California? 

Sandhya Dirks

For the past eight years, one weekend in late summer brings first responders from across the country and around the world -- firemen, medics, SWAT teams and police officers --  to Alameda County for Urban Shield, one of the largest law enforcement training exercises in the country.

Brett Myers / Youth Radio

The August shooting of Michael Brown touched off protests and sparked a national discussion about race and justice. The 18-year-old African-American man was unarmed when he was shot multiple times by a Ferguson, Missouri police officer. Youth Radio reporter Myles Bess lives in Oakland, California, and five years ago he lived through the police shooting of another unarmed black teen, Oscar Grant. Bess traveled to Ferguson for the protests and the funeral of Michael Brown, and he sent us this audio postcard reflecting on what happens next as things quiet down in that town.

Your Call: How should we talk about racism?

Aug 25, 2014

On the August 26th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with filmmaker and Founder & President of World Trust, Dr. Shakti Butler about her documentary, Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity. The documentary explores racism, as a dynamic system with multiple layers functioning simultaneously. So what are different forms of racism and racial inequality and how should it be confronted?  Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Shakti Butler, filmmaker and Founder & President of World Trust

On the August 22nd edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of what’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. The ongoing protests continue to receive global attention.  Who’s asking the right questions and taking fresh angles? We’ll also talk about Mexico, which has become of the most dangerous countries for journalists. We’ll be joined by St. Louis American’s Chris King and the Dallas Morning News’ Alfredo Corchado. Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Holly Kernan and you.

Guests:

  

On the August 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the militarization of police forces across the country. According to a recent ACLU report, last year, the Department of Homeland Security pumped $1 billion into local law enforcement, while the Department of Defense supplied another $449 million worth of equipment for police forces.  Why are police so heavily armed? And how is this playing out in places like Ferguson, Missouri?  Join the conversation on Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests: