film

  

On the July 23rd edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the new feature film The Stanford Prison Experiment. 

Satyajit Ray put India on the map of world cinema with his Apu Trilogy, and the negatives were thought to be destroyed in a fire.

It might take a village to raise a child. But it took three continents to raise one little village in Bengal from its ashes.

Disasters often befall the Golden Gate Bridge. You know, in the movies.

This story originally aired on September 18, 2014.

Michael Lionstar

Awards season is behind us, with top honors for acting handed out at the Golden Globes and Oscars. But after all the pomp and circumstance is over and the red carpet is rolled backed up, have you ever wondered -- what does it all mean? That’s the subject of Why Acting Matters, a new book by acclaimed film critic -- and San Francisco local -- David Thomson.

There are ten official plagues in Exodus: Gods and Kings. But there’s an eleventh unofficial one plaguing the Ridley Scott film.  The Nile might have turned red in the Bible but the cast in the film has turned white. And that’s no visual effect.

  In a village in northern Bengal there are no silver bells or cockle shells. But there are pretty maids all in a row. Some 50,000 of them including 17-year-old Monica Burman. She grows bottle gourds, spinach, hyacinth beans. But this is no ordinary kitchen garden. It’s drawn the attention of an Oscar winning filmmaker Megan Mylan.

She won an Oscar for a short documentary called Smile Pinki the same year Slumdog Millionare swept the awards.  Her new short film "After My Garden Grows" brings her back to India.

Sandip Roy met Mylan and Monica at a hotel in Bengal.

Ever wonder what happens to films too bizarre for the big, or even small screen? Many of them end up at Oddball Film and Video, a stock footage company in San Francisco’s Mission District. Oddball houses more than 50,000 unusual films, most of them on their original 16mm reels. The collection has everything from vintage erotica to outlandish commercials to quirky after-school specials.

http://www.nunsonthebusmovie.com/

As head of the Catholic Social Justice group network, Sister Simone Campbell, who is a nun, worked for immigration reform, healthcare, and economic justice. In 2010, when the Affordable Care Act was being debated in Congress, she wrote a letter in support of the bill, and was able to get 60 signatures from religious orders in the US on it.

Marriage begets crisis in "Love is Strange"

Aug 28, 2014

Love is Strange is a new film starring John Lithgow and Alfred Molina as an older gay couple, together 39 years, who get married after New York legalizes same sex marriage. That's when their troubles begin.  Hear scenes from the film and hear director and co-writer Ira Sachs tell us about his inspiration. Eric Jansen hosts. Love is Strange opens in San Francisco Bay Area theaters Friday August 28.  (Broadcast Thursday, 8/28/14)

Takei was one of the first stars to portray Asian Americans in a positive light on the small screen. But he’s been a role model in other ways too. In 2005, at the age of 68, he came out as gay and became a fierce advocate for marriage equality. He’s also spoken out against the kind of hatred that landed him and his family in the a Japanese-American internment campo during World War II.

In her new film 'To Be Takei', Jennifer Kroot takes a close look at Takei’s life, spanning from his recent activism to his internment as a child. Kroot spoke with KALW's Hana Baba.

  

7pm Thursday, meet Cheyenne Jackson -  in his own words, "AmFAR's bitch."  He's an award-winning Broadway actor, movie star, songwriter and singer who tonight and tomorrow sings classic film songs in “Hello Gorgeous!” Cheyenne Jackson Goes to the Movies with the San Francisco Symphony. On tonight's Out in the Bay, a sampling of his music -- including a short a cappella in-studio special just for us -- and he talks about his creative and activist passions.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/child-sex-trafficking-a-story-about-love

 

Oakland activist and filmmaker Sheri Shuster has been advocating against the sex trafficking of youth for more than a decade. Her new film, 'Child Sex Trafficking: A Story About Love,' exposes and explores the world of girl trafficking in Oakland through the story and activism of trafficking survivor Leah Albright-Byrd. 

Tonight is opening night at CAAMFest, the country's largest Asian American film festival.  The 11 day event showcases local and international films focusing on Asian food, music, and people. Festival director Masashi Niewano spoke with KALW's Melanie Young about this year's festival highlights.

aquariaumofthebay.org

The San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival will screen over 40 films from more than a dozen countries beginning this week.  Executive Director Ana Blanco stopped by KALW to give us a preview of this year’s program.

"When I go to the ocean now I realize, that what might be happening to us here locally, is probably happening to somebody else halfway around the world as well."

It may have been passed over for an Oscar nomination, but the New York Times calls The Lunchbox a Bollywood anomaly - a  quiet movie of unexpressed anguish and yearning instead of movies that clutch viewers by the throat and assault them with glamour, pizazz and dancing.

But what’s really surprising about  The Lunchbox is it actually really made a splash in India with a love story so low key, so subtle, one can hardly call it a romance. The lovers don’t meet. They just exchange notes in a lunchbox. Real handwritten notes . About life. And food.

A Big Screen Must See

Jan 15, 2014

Satyajit Ray is India’s most acclaimed filmmaker.  But from Friday, January 17th, film lovers in the Bay Area will be able to see something people in India don’t really get to experience anymore. The films of Ray, restored and cleaned, on the big screen.

The Pacific Film Archive will screen the films of Satyajit Ray starting Jan. 17th.

  Another Hole in the Head is the most popular indie horror and sci-fi film fest in San Francisco and it is marking its tenth year this month by expanding its usual two-week run to three with more locations, more movies, and more local filmmakers. George Kaskanlian spoke with KALW’s Ashleyanne Krigbaum about what creeps you’re in for this year.

We’re used to making movies here in California, but there are still places in the world where that art form is rare. Like in Saudi Arabia, which recently submitted an entry to the Foreign Film category of the Academy Awards for the first time ever. 

I Love You Box

Sep 25, 2013
Wikipedia

Love in India is often over the top. In the weekly magazine Open I read about a 30-year old lawyer in the town of Patna. He leaves I love you notes for his girlfriend written in blood. But he doesn’t slit his wrists to do it because  he says one needs to be innovative, not stupid. So it’s a little surprising to find a Hindi film making a splash with a love story so low key, so subtle, one can hardly call it a romance. The lovers don’t meet. They just exchange notes in a lunchbox. Real handwritten notes . About life. And food.

Revolutionary Optimists

Jun 12, 2013
The Revolutionary Optimists / http://revolutionaryoptimists.org

Whenever I hear the words film, slum, Kolkata my heart sinks a little. Whether it’s an Oscar winning documentary or a feature film, it always feels a little queasy – the poor as the object of pity.

www.ebbc.org/ / East Bay Bike Coalition

This weekend brings not just Mother’s Day, but National Garden Day, too! Find out some ways to celebrate them both – and where you can exercise your mind and body – in this week’s Arts/Culture/Weekend!

Courtesy of adamanddog.tumblr.com

I’ve always been intrigued by the short features that are nominated for Academy Awards every year. Everybody (who watches movies) is familiar with the best picture nominees, the best actors, actresses, and directors. But only recently have I become aware that the shorts that win the same awards are available to be seen as well.


This weekend marks the Arab Film Festival in the San Francisco Bay Area, with 40 films showing this year from all over the Arab world.

The Palestinian short film Private Sun deals with the ironic reality of being Vitamin D deficient in a sun-drenched country like Palestine. It’s increasingly a problem among the country’s women, many of whom cover their bodies in public.

Imagine you can witness the most beautiful, and most disturbing, sights in the world. Riding a hot air balloon over exquisite Burmese temples; descending into poisonous sulfur mines in Java; meeting robot clones in Japan; exploring factory farms in China. These are some of the images of Samsara: a new feature film from Emeryville director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson now showing in Berkeley and San Francisco.

Courtesy of The Spot

More of a police presence and better police community relations are good ways to prevent violence, but a group of young men in Oakland are trying a different approach. They call themselves "Warriors for Peace,” and they are part of a violence prevention program that equips and trains teens to make films about Oakland. The hope is that from behind a lens, they will see their city, and themselves, a little differently. 

While The Birds and Vertigo may be some of the more obvious classic films featuring the Bay Area, a new exhibit showing at the Old Mint building in San Francisco is exploring the obvious, the not so obvious, and the downright obscure. The exhibit is entitled "The Stuff that Dreams are made of: San Francisco and the Movies," and it shows scripts, collectibles, artwork and posters from films shot in San Francisco. One room is dedicated to movie posters from classic Noir films related to the City by the Bay.

D Street Media's CEO Dexter Davis: How does an openly gay African-American man become a film mogul? He acted like one. Hear Marilyn Pittman's interview with D Street Media CEO Dexter Davis. His global film production and distribution company includes productions in Berlin, Buenos Aires and Los Angeles.

Making "Reel" Change with Independent Film

Mar 13, 2012
San Francisco International Film Festival
courtesy of San Francisco International Film Festival

San Francisco has more film festivals than any other city in the country besides New York. In fact, the oldest film festival still running anywhere in the Americas is the San Francisco International Film festival - started in 1957. But San Francisco is also know as a progressive, activist city. Is there a connection between San Francisco’s activism and its love for independent cinema? What makes film such a powerful tool? And when art combines with public policy, do filmmakers have a responsibility more in line with journalists than artists?

Guests:

Photo Courtesy of Jimmy Ryan Balboa Be Bop Band

 

No, jazz legend Coleman Hawkins is not from the Bay Area, and he’s not back from the dead. But you’ll learn about him, and other jazz greats, in the Academy Award-nominated documentary, “A Great Day in Harlem,” which you can see at the Balboa Theater in San Francisco on Sunday (January 29).

The program also includes live jazz from Jimmy Ryan’s Balboa Be-Bop Band, both before the film, and then again after.