fire

ABC7 News

Here’s what’s happening around the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News

 

 Rent-controlled units are now more abundant in San Francisco than in New York City // SF Examiner

On January 28th, a fire consumed a mixed-use apartment building on 22nd and Mission. The conflagration destroyed more than 30 local businesses, and displaced over sixty people. Mauricio Orellana, a resident in the building, lost his life.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, February 5, 2015

Feb 5, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

OPD Still Appears to be Targeting Blacks // East Bay Express

Rhian Miller

 

In Monte Rio, a rural community on the Russian River a few miles south of Guerneville, volunteer Fire Chief Steve Baxman is on-call 24 hours a day. And when there is an emergency call, other members of his all-volunteer crew join him.

Fighting the Mission Bay blaze

Mar 13, 2014
Kenneth Smith

Two days ago, the San Francisco skyline was covered in thick black smoke. It came from a fire that tore through a construction site in the Mission Bay neighborhood. 

Tuesday’s five alarm fire was the biggest the city has seen since 2012. Ultimately, 150 firefighters responded, with almost 50 vehicles, and they used a lot of water. 

KALW’s Ben Trefny spoke with Mindy Talmidge, the Public Information Officer at the San Francisco Fire Department, to get a sense of how they take on a blaze this big, where the water had to come from, and and how much water it took to fight it.


European Commission

Pollution and the environment have always been big issues for Californians. A statewide survey conducted by the Public Policy Institute of California last month showed that approximately half the state’s residents see air pollution as a serious threat to their health.

Among African Americans and Latinos, concern is even greater.  The majority of those polled in these groups believe that people in lower-income areas are disproportionately affected by air pollution.

Julie Caine

If you saw the lead story of today's San Francisco Chronicle, you would have seen a photo of a long line of people outside a lawyer's office in Richmond, near a sign that says: "Chevron Claims Filed Here." 

D.H. Parks, under CC License / http://www.flickr.com/photos/parksdh/7730542302/

The smoke from the Chevron refinery fire that started late Monday has cleared, but the controversy was still hot at a community meeting last night in Richmond. Around 700 people attended the meeting, where Chevron General Manager Nigel Hearne and local government and health officials faced frustration and anger.

Joan Davis from the Richmond Community Foundation began the meeting with some powerful questions: “Those of you who are feeling afraid, very quietly, stand. Those of you who are feeling angry, please stand, quietly.”

Flickr user D.H. Parks, Under CC License / http://www.flickr.com/photos/parksdh/

Last night’s fire at the Chevron refinery in Richmond put city residents in a state of panic. The fire sent up a huge plume of black smoke, stopping traffic, closing bridges, and shutting down BART stations.

The large-scale chemical fire still has local residents concerned for their health and safety. Many say they heard about the fire late, and that the multi-lingual phone system that is supposed to alert the diverse communities of Richmond in case of a disaster didn’t work. 

Cal Fire

It’s summer in California, which means fire season is in full force – and it could be the worst one in years. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, better known as CAL FIRE, responds to more than 5,000 wildfires each year. They protect more than 31 million acres of California’s privately-owned wildlands and provide emergency services for most of the state’s counties.

BART back on track after service shutdown

Jun 14, 2012
Julie Caine

After a full shutdown of service between San Francisco and Oakland since early this morning, transbay BART service is now fully restored, but the agency is warning commuters to expect delays. AC Transit spokesman Clarence Johnson said at least 20 extra buses will shuttle passengers across the bay at no cost; 511.org is reporting that these buses will run until about 6pm. The San Francisco Bay Ferry service will also deploy two extra ferries per hour.