food bank

Taylor Skillin

It’s no wonder that the Tenderloin has become a melting pot of San Francisco’s vibrant Asian and Latino immigrant culture.

The neighborhood is often the first stop for many immigrants to the city. Nearly 30 languages are spoken within a 10-block radius. It’s only getting more diverse, and service workers, nonprofits, and soup kitchens are struggling to keep up.

Behind the scenes at the San Francisco Food Bank

Feb 24, 2015
San Francisco and Marin Food Bank

Paul Ash is the executive director of the San Francisco and Marin Food Banks. And he’s taking us on a tour of the main distribution center in Potrero Hill.

Alameda County Community Foodbank

Earlier this month, a temporary increase in food stamps—enacted during the financial crisis—expired. More than 47 million people are affected—that’s one in seven Americans. These are the deepest cuts to the federal program since it started back in 1964. It means that a family of three now has 29 dollars less to spend on food every month.

In California, the food stamp program is called Cal-Fresh. And local food banks are seeing first hand what happens when money is cut. Keisha Nzewi, the Advocacy Manager for the Alameda County Community Food Bank  came to the station here at  KALW to talk about the future of food distribution in the Bay Area.

http://www.arribajuntos.org/services.html / Arriba Juntos

The San Francisco and Marin Food Banks provide food to 225,000 people each year through different food programs – one of these is their food pantry program. Seventeen percent of the people the food banks serve are homeless. The rest are low-wage workers, older adults, children and the unemployed. The food for the food pantry program is distributed by 230 local pantries in the area, including a small neighborhood organization in San Francisco’s Mission district every Thursday.