On the Agust 29th edition of Your Call, it's our Friday media roundtable. This week, we'll discuss coverage of Bank of America's $16 billion settlement over allegations of mortgage-related misconduct in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis. We'll also discuss the political crisis in Ukraine. We'lll be joined by The Huffington Post’s Ben Hallman, the Christian Science Monitor’s Fred Weir, and's David Dayen. Where did you see the best reporting this week? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Protections for homeowners and tenants in foreclosure or who have gone through foreclosure.

Guests:  Leon Bayer, Certified Specialist in Bankruptcy Law; Keith Ogden, Staff Attorney, Community Legal Services in East Palo Alto; Shirley Gibson, Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County; and Maeve Elise Brown, Executive Director, Housing and Economic Rights Advocates.
Listeners with questions or comments for Chuck and his guests, please call 415-841-4134.

Bankruptcy Law.

Oct 10, 2013

Bankruptcy Law:  Financially desperate consumers dealing with loan sharks, and consumer rights regarding student debt. 

Guest:  Certified Specialist in Bankruptcy Law Leon Bayer.

Listeners with questions/comments for Chuck Finney and Leon Bayer, please call: 415-841-4134

Interview with bankruptcy attorney Leon Bayer.

Under CC license from Flickr user CoCo ACCE

The City of Richmond was hit hard when the housing bubble burst – about 12,000 homeowners there are underwater. That’s roughly half of all mortgage holders in the city.  Richmond’s City Council recently approved a radical new plan to use eminent domain to buy underwater mortgages and resell them to beleaguered homeowners at lower prices. Richmond mayor Gayle McLaughlin spoke with KALW's Holly Kernan about her city’s radical plan to help homeowners drowning in debt.

Photo courtesy of

The recent $26 billion bank settlement found that the nation’s five largest banks engaged in a pattern of unfair and deceptive practices in servicing mortgages and dealing with loan modifications. And yet, hundreds of thousands of Californians have lost their homes. 

Photo by Casey Miner

Since the country’s foreclosure crisis began in 2007, nearly four million people have lost their homes. In the Bay Area, more than 750,000 homes have been foreclosed. And even though the economy might be getting better, they’re still happening.

Today on Your Call: Friday Media Roundtable

Apr 13, 2012
Jung Yeon-je / AFP/Getty Images / April 13, 2012

On today’s Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll have a conversation about the recently signed Jobs Act, which the White House says will create jobs. Critics say it legalizes stock market fraud. We’ll also discuss the ongoing foreclosure crisis, and North Korea's decision to fire a long-range missile. We’ll be joined by the Huffington Post’s Micheal MacCuliff, Propublica’s Paul Kiel and the Christina Science Monitor’s Don Kirk joins us from Seoul, South Korea. What was your story of the week? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Jen Chien

Josephine Tolbert’s house is locked. It has a “No Trespassing” sign posted on the front door, but through the small lace-curtained windows at the front of the house, she can still see her daycare business.

“We have a little table where the kids draw, and play little games. There's a radio in the back that plays kiddie music, and they do their little kiddie dance. And its a wonderful daycare, I love it and the kids love it … It is beautiful, I wish you could get in there,” she describes.